RSSAll Entries in the "News" Category

PCC previews Kahlo exhibit

PCC previews Kahlo exhibit

Share

By ANDRE CHAVIRA

Broadway set designer Scott Pask discussed inspiration when he previewed an upcoming Frida Kahlo exhibit during a Pima Community College reception.

“This is very special for Tucson, and a very special collaboration as it’s the first that the New York Botanical Gardens has ever had” Pask said during an interview before the presentation.

After record-breaking attendance during a New York exhibition, Tucson Botanical Gardens partnered with PCC to have Pask bring the Kahlo exhibit to Tucson. The exhibit will provide a look into Frida Kahlo’s famous Casa Azul.

PCC hosted a reception April 22 at the Pima District Office to bring together the community and give insight into the construction and inspiration of the exhibit.

The theme of “Welcome Home” will be highlighted by bringing the Tucson community into the house of one of the most celebrated artists in history.

During the exhibit there will be a two week installment period which will close off the wildflower garden. The unveiling of the exhibit takes place opening night.

Tucson will be the second and final stop of the continuation of the New York Botanical Garden’s celebration of Kahlo’s first solo exhibition in over 25 years.

Patricia Houston, PCC acting vice president of instruction for Downtown Campus, explained that along with celebrating Kahlo’s work this event serves as a tool that has brought many different parts of the Tucson community together.

“Frida Kahlo: Art, Garden, Life” will open on Oct. 10 and will remain open until May 16 at the Tucson Botanical Gardens, 2150 N. Alvernon Way.

For more information on Pask’s Frida-inspired work, visit nybg.org/frida.

Patricia Houston, Scott Pask and Michelle Conklin pose for a photo during a reception for Pask at PCC’s community boardroom on April 22.

Patricia Houston, Scott Pask and Michelle Conklin pose for a photo during a reception for Pask at PCC’s community boardroom on April 22.

Share
Desert Vista showcases campus programs

Desert Vista showcases campus programs

Share

Pima Community College’s Desert Vista campus celebrated its second annual student showcase April 28, spotlighting programs ranging from culinary to surgical technician.

More than 200 students and 25 faculty and staff members participated, according to coordinator Rene Forsyth.

Visitors enjoyed music and food, as well as an opportunity to win gift cards to Fire House Subs.

Raffle items offered Pima “swag” including T-shirts, notepads, pens and a Desert Vista banner.

The free event was open to all Pima students, faculty, staff and community members.

-By Melina Casillas

Pg05-DV culinary demo

Culinary student Juan Cordova demonstrates how to properly cut a raw chicken during a display at the Desert Vista Showcase on April 28.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phi Theta Kappa members, from left, Sergio Castro, Lyra Troy and Sage Cutler present information about the national honor society.

Phi Theta Kappa members, from left, Sergio Castro, Lyra Troy and Sage Cutler present information about the national honor society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community resident Belgica Macias, left, listens as  surgical tech student Yasmin Espinoza de Mendoza shows how to properly handle surgical tools. The Desert Vista Showcase spotlighted a variety of campus programs.

Community resident Belgica Macias, left, listens as surgical tech student Yasmin Espinoza de Mendoza shows how to properly handle surgical tools. The Desert Vista Showcase spotlighted a variety of campus programs.

Share
Aztec Press wins awards

Aztec Press wins awards

Share

The Aztec Press team can add two more awards to the newsroom wall of honors.

The Society of Professional Journalists awarded the newspaper first place as best non-daily newspaper in its Region 11 Mark of Excellence award on April 30. The annual contest recognizes the best in college journalism.

Published work from 2015 issues was judged against publications in Arizona, California, Nevada and Hawaii.

The paper will now compete with winners from the other 11 regions in the national competition, with finalists announced this fall.

Exiting editor-in-chief Jamie Verwys was awarded second place in Community Public Service reporting in Arizona Press Club competition. Her series was about Pima Community College’s history of transparency with the media and PCC police reports.

 

-By Jamie Verwys

Share
FULBRIGHT SCHOLAR LECTURE Physician to discuss diabetes research

FULBRIGHT SCHOLAR LECTURE Physician to discuss diabetes research

Share

By S. PAUL BRYAN

Bow-tied  Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Reginald N. Oputa shows his kindness with a welcoming handshake and a smile.

Dr. Oputa, a Nigerian endocrinologist, is enjoying his tenure in Arizona and says he’s looking forward to his upcoming lecture on diabetes.

He will discuss “Diabetes Mellitus: A Global Epidemic with a Potential Solution” on April 26 at 6 p.m. at the PCC District Office Community Board Room, C-105, 4905 E. Broadway Blvd.

Oputa speaks highly of Pima Community College and Tucson.

“Pima College is a great institution,” he said. “I am happy to be here and very grateful for the people here who have assisted me in so many ways. And the weather, it is beautiful.”

The Fulbright Scholar Program is a program of the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

“Having Dr. Oputa here has been a wonderful experience,” said Mary Beth Ginter, an academic dean at West Campus.

“I helped write the grant that brought Dr. Oputa here,” she added. “I believe, in this society, it’s very important to try and internationalize the PCC campus.”

Oputa was thrilled the Fulbright program allowed him to bring his wife , Prisca, and two of his five children with him from Nigeria in January.

His wife will remain with him until his residency ends in June, but his two children had to return home for school.

During the residency, Oputa has made presentations and engaged with faculty of the University of Arizona School of Medicine and School of Public Health.

He also works to promote civic diplomacy and outreach, and has participated in the PCC Faculty Senate.

Oputa is a consultant physician and a lecturer at the College of Medical Sciences at Imo State University in Nigeria.

He has spent his lifetime working in medicine and was a member of the Nigerian military, predominantly working to assist both his community and the world in the areas of HIV and diabetes.

His work on the HIV epidemic in Uganda and Nigeria provided both knowledge and insight.

“As a colonel in the Nigerian military, I worked with members of the U.S. Defense Department,” Oputa said. “We were able to build an infectious disease institute in Uganda and we went from three to over 100 clinics in Nigeria.”

Working with Americans also exposed Oputa to U.S. culture.

He retired from the military as a colonel in 2006 and continued his research and work in medicine.

Along with his medical degree, he earned a master of science in chemical pathology and is a fellow and vice president of the Endocrine and Metabolism Society of Nigeria.

Oputa’s current research explores the relationship between peptides and the duration of diabetes mellitus. His latest study, released in January, was conducted at the Federal Medical Center in Owerri, located in southeast Nigeria.

The objective of the study was to evaluate any connections between C-peptide estimation and important variables in the management of diabetes.

The variables include the duration of illness, blood pressure, body mass index, age and gender.

The study, the first of its kind at the Federal Medical Center, concluded that C-peptide values decrease as the duration of diabetes increases.

It also found that obese diabetes patients have higher C-peptide values than non-obese patients, suggesting a greater degree of insulin resistance among obese patients.

Taking care of one’s self is the best form of preventative care, Oputa stressed.

“I believe that self management is key,” he said. “Ninety percent of diabetes patients are type 2. They should focus on healthy living.”

Reading plays a significant role in the doctor’s life. He speaks excitedly of books that have made an impact on him.

“Obama’s two books were important to me,” he said. “Those books show the beauty of American culture.”

He is currently reading “Empire Falls” by Richard Russo.

“It shows me an example of the American life … very interesting,” he said.

The Billy Graham book “Death and the Life After” was another important book in his life.

Although born into a Roman Catholic belief system, Oputa became a born-again Christian after meeting his wife in 1988 and choosing to follow her faith. He now considers himself to be a Pentecostal Christian.

“God is for everyone,” Oputa said.

In his free time, Oputa enjoys playing squash. Along with his wife, he is also an active member of Siloam Freeway Church in Tucson.

“My belief is anyone who is living a good life will have a meeting with God,” he said.

Oputa is quick to share his goals related to his work with diabetes.

“My primary goal is to have well informed, educated people,” he said.

FYI

Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence lecture

Topic: “Diabetes Mellitus: A Global Epidemic with a Potential Solution”

When: April 26 at 6 p.m.

Where: PCC District Office

Community Board Room, C-105,

4905 E. Broadway Blvd.

Details: 206-4778

Photo courtesy of PCC Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Reginald N. Oputa will lecture on diabetes April 26.

Photo courtesy of PCC
Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Reginald N. Oputa will lecture on diabetes April 26.

Share
Former employee sues Pima

Former employee sues Pima

Share

By EDDIE CELAYA

Pima Community College and Chancellor Lee Lambert are facing a civil rights lawsuit from a former employee, who alleges she was fired due to retaliation stemming from her reporting sexual harassment at the hands of former chancellor Roy Flores.

The former employee, Imelda Cuyugan, alleges that she was fired from her position of assistant vice chancellor for government relations due to her gender and for reporting the sexual harassment allegations.

“We are unable to discuss pending litigation, other than to say that we do feel Ms. Cuyugan’s claims are without merit,” PCC spokeswoman Libby Howell said.

Cuyugan had been appointed to the government relations position once during the Flores administration, only to leave the job after alleging sexual harassment at the hands of Flores.

The claim alleges that “her work environment became so hostile, she had to transfer to a staff classification position within PCC as campus director of administrative services for the Northwest Campus.”

PCC issued a response letter saying that Cuyugan’s work wasn’t up to snuff and the college had “a legitimate, nondiscriminatory reason for taking the employment action it took.”

Cuyugan was reinstated to the government relations position after a court settlement in 2012. She reached a settlement with PCC  and also received $30,000 in the lawsuit alleging harassment by Flores.

Soon after, Cuyugan alleges, things began to go south.

During an Aug. 16, 2013 meeting between Lambert and Cuyugan, according to the claim, “Chancellor Lambert was adversarial with Ms. Cuyugan, and accused her of being a problem.”

This seems to fly in the face of evaluations and commendations that others within PCC were giving Cuyugan at the time. PCC Interim Chancellor Zelema Harris, Cuyugan’s immediate supervisor, said Cuyugan was doing “an excellent job,” according to Cuyugan’s file of claim.

After Cuyugan met with Lambert, she reportedly arranged a meeting with Board of Governors member Sylvia Lee to complain of Lambert’s treatment of her.

The Aztec Press reached out to Lee for comment on multiple occasions.

Her reply: “PCC policy is to not speak on pending litigation.”

PCC also may have violated its own college policies according to the claim.  Section II (D)(1) of PCC’s Administrative Personnel Policy Statement reads: “An administrator will be offered a new contract for the ensuing fiscal year unless he/she is otherwise notified in writing on or before February 15.”

According to Cuyugans’ claim, it was not until June 13, 2014 that “Provost Harris notified Ms. Cuyugan that her contract for academic year 2014/2015 would not be renewed.”

Lambert then notified Cuyugan that she would be offered a three-month contract and an opportunity to compete for positions that were open.  According to Cuyugans’ claim, he also eliminated the government relations position and department, keeping the one male staff member and hiring another female.

The case will now go before a jury.

 

Share
PCC bill  signed into law

PCC bill signed into law

Share

By EDDIE CELAYA

Pima Community College and other state community colleges will gain more flexible access to funds already raised.

SB 1322 passed the Arizona State House on March 21 by a vote of 39-18.  There were three abstentions.  The bill went to Governor Doug Ducey’s desk, where he signed it into law on March 24, 2016.

SB 1322, which was backed by the PCC Education Association and Arizona Community College Coordinating Council, allows the colleges to determine their Full Time Student Enrollment figures by using either a 5-year or 10-year average of enrollment.

It will also allow for weighted enrollments for students enrolled in career and technical education classes and programs, since those programs are more expensive than more standard curriculum.

Under the old expenditure limit formula, FTSE was determined by each college’s estimates of their enrollment.

The Arizona Tax Research Association, which opposed SB 1322, had insisted the colleges move away from estimation , due to over-reporting.

ATRA proposed using audited enrollment, but the college’s lobbying efforts convinced legislators of the plan’s infeasibility.

The signing of SB 1322 is a “major leap forward for the economic development of the state,” Chancellor Lee Lambert said.

“Pima Community College is grateful to Gov. Ducey, and to leaders in Southern Arizona’s business, education and academic communities for their support of an initiative that will help Arizona’s workforce be competitive in the rapidly changing 21st-century global marketplace,” said an official PCC press release.

Share
THE WORD: How are you helping the environment?

THE WORD: How are you helping the environment?

Share

Photos and interviews by Andres Chavira at East Campus

“Recently they put a recycling bin in my building and I also compost as much as I can.” Brandt Birkholm Major: Business

“Recently they put a recycling bin in my building and I also compost as much as I can.”
Brandt Birkholm
Major: Business

“I throw things into a recycling bin, I try not to use plastic as often and I also reuse a lot of it to make art projects.” Angelica Valenzuela Major: Fine Arts

“I throw things into a recycling bin, I try not to use plastic as often and I also reuse a lot of it to make art projects.”
Angelica Valenzuela
Major: Fine Arts

“I stay green by unplugging all electrical devices that I don’t need when I leave the house to conserve energy.” Max Bracamonte Major: Film and Media Production

“I stay green by unplugging all electrical devices that I don’t need when I leave the house to conserve energy.”
Max Bracamonte
Major: Film and Media Production

“I use a lot of old plastic containers again; my grandmother taught me to do that. I also do a lot of recycled material DIYs.” Naya Cordova Major: Nursing

“I use a lot of old plastic containers again; my grandmother taught me to do that. I also do a lot of recycled material DIYs.”
Naya Cordova
Major: Nursing

“When it comes to recycling, I usually reuse plastic containers and attend sustainability conventions in Tempe every year.” Arturo Noriega Major: Business Management

“When it comes to recycling,
I usually reuse plastic
containers and attend sustainability conventions
in Tempe every year.”
Arturo Noriega
Major: Business Management

Share
From the Editor: It’s not goodbye if you take it with you

From the Editor: It’s not goodbye if you take it with you

Share

By JAMIE VERWYS

At first, I wanted to be a poet and play distracting games with punctuation, use commas carelessly and write the ugliness of the world into something pretty.

Somewhere in the weird beginning of adulthood I just wanted life  to get better. I made so many  mistakes. Without those little poems I scribbled, the ugliness might have never let me step out from under it.

About two years ago when I joined the Aztec Press, I said entertainment was the section for me. It’s kind of funny because now I love AP style and cover hard news.

This was an upswing in  my life. I was back in school, done partying and had spent a summer writing for music blogs. I wanted to be a music journalist but  resolved  to write a little bit of everything.

As I sit here and write my last From the Editor, I can’t help but feel emotional.

I wrote what felt like 1,000 leads. All the stories from the past couple of years flashed through my head. I remembered going to the strip club at 11 a.m. for  a piece on exotic dancers, all the time I spent on the transparency series and  the voices of all those interesting people. I sure wrote some of everything.

For three semesters I have addressed you, readers, as editor in chief. In that time, I have come to know you well. I have seen the passion and love at Pima Community College and I’m proud to have helped tell this college’s story.

Thank you for being such a wonderful subject. All the newsworthy  events—good and bad—that have happened at Pima, have trained me so well. It was great to meet you, look you in the eyes and talk. I will miss the diverse group at Pima.

The hardest part of this piece, is that I am trying to say goodbye and really honor this paper and this team. There’s no way I can sum up this life-changing experience in anything less than a novel’s length.

It’s not really goodbye, because that newsroom at West Campus will always be in my heart, and the Aztec Press continues on.

Thank you to the all the wonderful reporters and editors I have worked with during my time here. Some of my best friendships were made over printouts and junk food. I have learned so much from my peers and I wish I had room to share our funniest, warmest and craziest moments.

I’m also proud to announce that the newspaper has been honored by the Society of Professional Journalists as a Region 11 finalist in the Mark of Excellence awards again. The 2015 staff did incredible work that I’ll never forget.

I was lucky to be part of multiple award-winning semesters.

I am so grateful for everything adviser Cynthia Lancaster has taught me. I wish my accident hadn’t taken me away from our last semester together. It’s going to be weird not checking in with and seeing her every week.

As I run out of time, I will say to the future reporters of Aztec Press, take good care of the paper. It’s an important service to Pima and can change your life.

To my dear “journo-friends,” I know we are going to succeed together and I feel blessed I get to be a part of it . Thank you for teaching, accepting and loving me.

You all mean so much to me.

It was an honor. Enjoy the issue.

Pg06-Opinion-Jamie Verwys

Share
PCC hosting April 22 reception to announce Frida Kahlo exhibit

PCC hosting April 22 reception to announce Frida Kahlo exhibit

Share

By ANDRES CHAVIRA

Tucson Botanical Gardens and Pima Community College are partnering to bring a blockbuster Frida Kahlo art exhibit to Tucson.

The exhibit will open Oct.10 and run until May 31, 2017.

“FRIDA KAHLO: Art, Garden, Life” was created by the New York Botanical Gardens. It replicates the rooms of Kahlo’s famous “La Casa Azul” home and gardens in Mexico City.

The exhibit is “a living tribute to her relationship with art and nature,” said Patricia Houston, Downtown Campus’ acting vice president of instruction.

Scott Pask, an eight-time Tony Award-winning Broadway set designer who graduated from the University of Arizona, designed the exhibit.

Pask will be in Tucson on April 22 for the public announcement and reception.

The reception will be held from 5-7 p.m. in PCC’s Community Board Room at the District Office, 4905 E. Broadway Blvd. Local musician Salvador Durán will perform, and light refreshments will be provided.

For more information on Pask’s Frida-inspired work, visit nybg.org/frida.

Share
Pima News

Pima News

Share

Desert Vista screening ‘My Depression’ documentary

Desert Vista Campus will screen the HBO documentary “My Depression (The Up and Down and Up Of It)” on April 25 beginning at 4 p.m. in the community room F-123.

A panel of professionals will answer questions about depression following the screening. Student Life will provide free pizza and drinks.

For more information, call 206-5030.

-By Melina Casillas

Downtown Campus hosts international festivities

International Community Day will take place April 28 at Downtown Campus from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. The free event will honor various Tucson-area cultures.

Everyone is welcome to experience an international blend of storytelling, cuisine and music. Participants will also host cultural displays and exhibits of traditional clothing, arts and crafts.

The activities and events will take place in the free speech area located south of the administration building.

For more information, email Michael Lopez at mlopez@pima.edu or Geselle Coe at gcoe@pima.edu.

-By Katta Mapes

Showcase to spotlight Desert Vista programs

Desert Vista Campus will hold a student showcase on April 28 from 4-7 p.m.

The event will spotlight student achievements in programs such as Culinary Arts. Activities will include demonstrations, academic and artistic presentations, campus tours, food and music.

The free activities are open to everyone in the community, and will take place in various locations throughout the campus.

For more information, call 206-5030.

-By Melina Casillas

May 3-5 Cram Jam offers

tutoring, games, stress relief

Northwest Campus will hold a Cram Jam on May 3-5 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. each day in the Student Life Center, Room D-201.

All currently registered PCC students are invited to enjoy free tutoring, games and snacks.

Stress reduction options include chair massages by students in the therapeutic massage program. Campus counselors will share stress reduction techniques and dogs will be available for pet therapy.

For more information, contact Student Life at 206-2131 or StudentLifeNWC@pima.edu.

-By Katta Mapes

Share
Broadway set designer will kick off Frida Kahlo exhibit

Broadway set designer will kick off Frida Kahlo exhibit

Share

By OSCAR CHAVIRA

Tucson Botanical Gardens and Pima Community College are partnering to bring a blockbuster Frida Kahlo art exhibit to Tucson.

The exhibit, created by the New York Botanical Gardens, replicates the rooms of her famous “La Casa Azul” home and gardens in Mexico City. The Tucson exhibit will open Oct.10 and run until May 31, 2017.

“FRIDA KAHLO: Art, Garden, Life” is “a living tribute to her relationship with art and nature,” according to Patricia Houston, Downtown Campus’ acting vice president of instruction.

The exhibit was designed by Scott Pask, an eight-time Tony Award-winning Broadway set designer who graduated from the University of Arizona.

Pask will be in Tucson April 22 to kick-off the public announcement of the exhibit.

A reception will be held from 5-7 p.m. in PCC’s Community Board Room at the District Office, 4905 E. Broadway Blvd. Local musician Salvador Durán will perform, and light refreshments will be provided.

For more information on Pask’s Frida-inspired work, visit nybg.org/frida.

If you are interested in the event RSVP by sending an email to collegeevents@pima.edu by April 18 as seating is limited.

Kahlo's "Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird" created in 1940. (Courtesy of PCC  Center for the Arts)

Kahlo’s “Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird” created in 1940. (Courtesy of PCC Center for the Arts)

Share
Graduating students invited to May 6 convocation

Graduating students invited to May 6 convocation

Share

By MICHEAL ROMERO

Pima Community College 2016 graduates and their families are invited to participate in a Multicultural Convocation at West Campus on May 6. Reservations are due by April 22.

The convocation, a small celebration honoring academic achievement and diversity, will feature music, international food and student testimonials.

The program will begin at 6 p.m. in the Aztecs Gymnasium and continue in the Palm Courtyard.

Participating graduates will receive a diversity sash that can be worn during the May 19 graduation ceremony.

Graduates can reserve space for the Multicultural Convocation with an email to the Office of College Events at collegeevents@pima.edu by April 22. Provide your name, email address, phone number and the number of guests you plan to bring.

The formal graduation ceremony will take place May 19 at the Tucson Convention Center Arena, 260 S. Church Ave.

You can find more information at www.pima.edu/events/multicultural-convocation/index.html

Share
Survey reveals lack of confidence

Survey reveals lack of confidence

Share

By EDDIE CELAYA

A recent survey from the Pima Community College Education Association has raised concerns about low morale among faculty members and questions about faculty trust in Chancellor Lee Lambert.

The results of the survey conducted by the PCCEA were made public in December 2015.

Of nearly 320 surveys sent, there were 263 responses, far exceeding PCCEA’s goal of a 50 percent response rate.

According to Pima spokesperson Libby Howell, PCC employs 350 full-time faculty.

Fifty-seven percent of respondents indicated that they were unhappy at the college, up from 24 percent in 2013.

Nearly half—47 percent—responded that they were considering leaving PCC altogether.  Reasons cited for this included feeling overworked and underappreciated, a lack of proper oversight, and low morale among staff.

The results are higher than they were in 2013 under former Chancellor Roy Flores.

Board member Sylvia Lee said that is not the fault of the current chancellor.

“Many of these new policies, such as mandatory attendance taking, are the direct result of either federal mandates or accreditation concerns and should have been implemented a decade ago,” Lee said.

She faulted the leadership of Flores for failing to implement policies in some cases and outright ignoring problems in others. For example, implementing a standardized syllabus is a requirement of accreditation by the Higher Learning Council.

That was implemented under Lambert’s leadership.

“I think some of this may have to do with those mandatory sort of policies; he implemented these and it should have been done much earlier,” Lee said.

The inclusion of the confidence question within the survey caught some instructors, including adjunct hospitality instructor and Adjunct Representative for the Faculty Senate Carlo Buscemi, off guard.

“It was a big surprise to us,” he said.

Buscemi added that, from an adjunct perspective, “a year ago things were very bad.  But in the last six, seven months, things have really turned around.  Gradually, the administration is listening.”

Mathematics instructor and PCCEA Co-Vice President Ana Jimenez said it was unclear if the survey accurately reflected low moral among faculty.

“PCCEA has not surveyed faculty again on this topic, so we cannot accurately state if morale has changed,” Jimenez said. “However, we are planning to include the morale question again in our annual survey of faculty next semester.”

Lambert said that PCC is “making important improvements, but they are challenging and difficult to implement. It’s understandable that faculty and other employees feel anxious.”

He encouraged the faculty to inform him of any concerns.

“I have encouraged them to reach out to me to express their concerns, and that’s why I am committed to listening and continuing the dialogue,” Lambert said.

The survey results showed a split in faculty support for Lambert.

Forty-eight percent of respondents marked either “strongly agree” or “agree” when asked if Lambert should be subject to a formal vote of confidence. Twenty percent of respondents were neutral, with the remaining 32 percent indicating they supported the chancellor.

A vote of confidence shows that a majority continues to support the policy of a leader.

While nearly 50 percent of responding faculty support holding a vote of confidence, that is not enough to warrant one, according to Jimenez.

“The survey results show that faculty are split with regard to a confidence vote on Chancellor Lee Lambert. PCCEA would never pursue a vote of such nature without an overwhelming mandate from faculty,” she said.

According to Lambert, however, the results are not “statistically valid,” and due to anonymity “one person could have voted 10, 15, or 20 times.”

Howell agreed.

“Neither the chancellor nor I believe that the survey was a statistically valid assessment of unhappiness,” she said. “For one thing, the same person could fill out the survey more than once, skewing the results.”

Lee echoed Lambert’s sentiments.

In an email to an employee, Lee said that “my guess is that (the vote of confidence question) was crafted by a handful of individuals with motives that are destructive.”

In response to those claims, Jimenez refuted the assertion that instructors had “stuffed the ballot box,” defending the surveys methods.

“We believe in the integrity of our faculty colleagues and feel that the open and honest answers fostered by anonymity greatly outweighs the need to track responses,” she said.

Instead, Jimenez suggested that the issues and concerns revealed in the survey need to be acknowledged by administration.

“The concerns expressed in the survey, however, need to be addressed. PCCEA has been in discussions with the Chancellor since January regarding the survey results and are actively working to respond productively to the issues raised,” she said.

Share
From The Editor: Remembering M. Scot Skinner

From The Editor: Remembering M. Scot Skinner

Share

By JAMIE VERWYS

The last words I would hear from M. Scot Skinner came to me in an email during my stay in the hospital. He wrote to say he hoped I was mending after my bike mishap.

Though Scot and I only got to interact briefly, it’s clear his kindness always stuck out to people. The man behind the great smile had left a life-long mark on his students, friends, family and the journalism community of Tucson.

Skinner passed away at 11 p.m. on April 3 after a three-week battle against a bacterial infection. While the 54-year-old was known for his work as a journalist with the Arizona Daily Star and the Tucson Weekly, Pima is deeply feeling the loss of a beloved writing instructor.

As I write this memorial to a man described by so many who knew him as incredibly kind, I know I am surrounded by student reporters who feel formed and inspired by Skinner’s mentorship. Several Aztec Press reporters learned the journalism basics from him in 101, worked with him on Sandscript and learned about his life.

Emery Nicoletti, a reporter in spring 2015, took Skinner’s media class because of his legacy and work at the Daily Star.

“He made the class an enjoyable place to be. Every second of it,” he said. “He was such a nice patient person.”

First semester reporter S. Paul Bryan reminisced about a class Skinner taught this semester, with so many different skill levels a curriculum was challenging.

“That class is almost impossible to teach,” he said. “But no one could have taught it better than Scot. This couldn’t have happened to a better guy.”

His Facebook now serves as a collage of memories, friendships and goodbyes from the many moved by Skinner.

The Daily Star, Weekly and several other publications shared the news and paid their respects. Some of the words used to describe him are lovely, loyal, giving, a wonderful conversationalist and hip.

  Many students and colleagues were inspired by the instructor during their budding writing careers.

Former Aztec Press reporter Caleb Foster reached out to share that Skinner was the first person to get him interested in Journalism.

Current reporter Eddie Celaya shares the sentiment.

“He was instrumental in my decision to join the Aztec Press,” he said. “With his encouragement, I have found I want to pursue journalism as a career, or something related. I have a voice and I really want that to be heard. Scot was the first person who really saw that.”

The love surrounding Skinner is overwhelmingly clear on the GoFundMe campaign started for his medical expenses on March 24. The goal to earn $5000 in donations was quickly surpassed, with the campaign earning $10,550.

Memorial services for Skinner will take place April 9 at Christ Presbyterian Church, 6565 E Broadway Blvd., at 10 a.m. Those wishing to support Skinner’s family may donate to the GoFundMe campaign, gofundme.com/cfvtndwk.

I wish I would have had the chance to work and learn with Scot. So many people in the community and college were enriched in their time knowing him. As a journalist, I’m thankful because he played a really important role for some talented current and student reporters.

We dedicate this issue to M. Scot Skinner and invite faculty and students to share their stories with us on the online edition.

Share
East Campus plans April 20 Career Fair

East Campus plans April 20 Career Fair

Share

A career fair at the East Campus will spotlight five programs on April 20 from 9 a.m.-noon.

The fair, hosted by Career Services and Student Life, will highlight:

• Administration of justice studies

• Emergency medical technology

• Logistics and supply chain management

• Pharmacy technology

• Veterinary technology

Students attending can network with employers and organizations to learn about opportunities in the nonprofit, healthcare, government, industry and business sectors.

For more information, contact East Campus Student Life at ec-studentlife@pima.edu or 206-7616.

-By Andres Chavira

Share