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THE WORD: Thoughts on Trump becoming president?

THE WORD: Thoughts on Trump becoming president?

Photos and interviews by Nicholas Trujillo at Desert Vista Campus

“Either way, no one was going to be happy. People shouldn’t judge everyone else, because everyone has a different opinion.”

pg03-word-paul-silva

Paul Silva

Major: Mechanical engineering

“It caused a lot of hate between everyone. We have to learn to connect with each other and just deal with it for four years.”

pg03-word-emily-rivera

Emily Rivera

Major: Veterinarian

“Both of them had too many of the bad things, so it was kind of a hard choice. I didn’t vote because those two weren’t the right ones for this country.”

pg03-word-kenneth-gonzales

Kenneth Gonzalez

Major: Computer engineering

“Disappointed. He doesn’t have the experience to run this country and I feel like he’s just going to run it into the ground.”

pg03-word-yvette-robles

Yvette Robles

Major: Athletic training

“Hopefully he does a good job. I think we’ll be OK. Hopefully we don’t go downhill real fast.”

pg03-word-jennifer-weisbrod

Jennifer Weisbrod

Major: Pharmacy

 

THE WORD: What's your favorite Thanksgiving food?

THE WORD: What’s your favorite Thanksgiving food?

Photos and interviews by Arlaeth Ramirez at Downtown Campus

 

pg03-word-logan-slater

“Sweet potatoes. It’s like desert while eating dinner.”

Logan Slater

Major: Liberal arts

 

pg03-word-jasmine-ballesteros

“Mashed potatoes have to be my favorite, just because of the gravy.”

Jasmine Ballesteros

Major: Physiology

 

pg03-word-alfarouq-azat

“My mom puts good stuff in the mashed potatoes. I’m not sure what I like, the mashed potatoes or the good stuff.”

Alfarouq Azat

Major: Electrical engineer

 

pg03-word-edna-morales

“I like turkey because that’s what Thanksgiving is for, to eats lots of turkey.”

Edna Morales

Major: English

 

pg03-word-cris-sesteaga

“Turkey. It tastes good.”

Cris Sesteaga

Major: Business administration

I.T. Girl: Free app provides local political info

I.T. Girl: Free app provides local political info

By KATELYN ROBERTS

We’ve all seen “Feel the Bern” merchandise, “I’m with Her” T-shirts and “Make America Great Again” baseball caps decked out on babies, students, Uber drivers and your racist grandpa.

Social media has also enjoyed the strongest influence ever in a presidential election. The candidates know this, and use it to their advantage.

For instance, Donald Trump utilized his social media accounts instead of paying $2 billion in advertising, according to a study by mediaQuant.

Researchers and strategists agree the quickest way to make news is by posting it directly to voters.

University of Arizona freshman Britanee Hudson, 23, and many others use Facebook as their vehicle for election information.

“I don’t watch the news,” Hudson said. “I, like most millennials, don’t have cable and have no interest in biased, fear-mongering media that I seem to find whenever the news does happen to be on.”

Hudson admits she’s not as knowledgeable as she’d like to be on Tucson politics but said, “I will be by election day.”

She began following politics after hearing a speech by a Democratic candidate for Arizona attorney general.

“I first became abnormally interested in local politics for my age in 2014 because I got the opportunity to hear Felecia Rotellini speak in Mesa,” she said.

Hudson was impassioned by Rotellin’s stance on immigration reform, so “started looking in depth with other local representatives as well.” She uses sites like Ballotpedia.org to research bills.

Oftentimes, however, voters don’t have enough information to make informed decisions about local politics.

This is where apps like Countable come in.

Countable keeps users up to date on local politics, whether you’re a student trying to ace a class or a citizen who wants to learn more about local issues.

Wired magazine calls it an “an easier way to pester your local congressmen.”

Countable is available for Android and iOS. Sign up for free, enter your zip code and select your interests. You’ll see your local politicians immediately, and can contact them. Each member has a profile on the app.

Users can get updates on which bills your local representatives voted on and how they voted. They can also watch voting in real time.

The user-friendly, photo-heavy layout is easy on the eyes too.

Countable offers a blog for daily news, and frequently rotates house and senate bill bios. Videos explain basics like why political ads have to end in an “I approve this message.”

The app only asks the user questions. It’s never biased, which makes it accessible for everyone.

I’ve personally found it useful for classes and for remaining politically aware.

Hudson put it well: “While this presidential election is of greater importance to me than elections in which I’ve voted in the past, it isn’t the president who going to raise the minimum wage or legalize marijuana in Arizona.”

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ELECTION BY THE NUMBERS

Compiled by Casey Muse Jr.

8*

Date in November when the election takes place.

 16*

Number of Republican candidates Donald Trump defeated on his way to the GOP nomination.

19*

Date in March 2000 when “The Simpsons” joked about Trump being president.

29*

Number of electoral votes in the important swing state of Florida.

45*

The sequence number of the next president. Barack Obama is the 44th U.S. president.

55*

Number of electoral votes in the largest state, California.

76*

Percentage chance that Hillary Clinton will win the general election.

100*

Percentage of African-American voters surveyed in Ohio and Pennsylvania who said they will not vote for Trump.

60,000*

Number of dollars that Trump’s hair weave supposedly costs.

.423.2 million**

Number of dollars raised by the Trump campaign as of Oct. 16.

 911.3 million**

Number of dollars raised by the Clinton campaign as of Oct. 16.

Sources:

* theguardian.com/us-news/2016/jul/31/election-2016-100-days-facts-and-figures

** bloomberg.com/politics/graphics/2016-presidential-campaign-fundraising

'Arizona Unseen' spotlights Louis Carlos Bernal photos

‘Arizona Unseen’ spotlights Louis Carlos Bernal photos

By ROBYN ZELICKSON

Pima Community College will host a photography exhibit titled “Louis Carlos Bernal: Arizona Unseen, Color Photographs 1978-1988” through Dec. 9 in the Louis Carlos Bernal Gallery.

The 48 color images, which have never been seen, are from the Louis Carlos Bernal Archive, located at the University of Arizona’s Center for Creative Photography.

The Pima exhibit will celebrate the 75th anniversary of Bernal’s birth by highlighting images the world-renowned photographer created during the 1970s and ‘80s.

The exhibit provides a look at the lives of Arizona migrant farm workers and of barrios in Tucson and Douglas.

“My images speak of the religious and family ties I have experienced as a Chicano,” Bernal wrote of his work. “I have concerned myself with the mysticism of the Southwest and the strength of the spiritual and cultural values of the barrio.”

Bernal founded the photography department at PCC and was an instructor for 17 years. On his way to teach at the West Campus in 1989, Bernal was in a serious bicycle accident. He died in 1993 after being in a coma for four years.

West Campus photography instructor Ann Simmons-Myers curated the Pima exhibit. She has been working since 2013 on a larger Bernal retrospective at the UA Center for Creative Photography, for display in the next few years.

“I am thrilled to be able to share these images with the community in celebration of Bernal’s 75th birthday and the Chicano culture he documented,” Simmons-Myers said.

PCC will host a reception at the gallery on Nov. 3 from 5-7 p.m. Simmons-Myers will give a talk at 6 p.m., during which she will introduce some of Bernal’s family members, including his daughters Lisa Bernal Brethour and Kristina Bernal.

Simmons-Myers will also discuss the process of producing each of the image groups in the exhibition. There will be time for a question-and-answer period.

The color in many of the original Bernal prints has been lost because of the quality of printing paper in earlier decades. High-resolution captures of the original negatives allowed Simmons-Myers to obtain new color prints for educational purposes.

Former Pima student Ernesto Esquer created the prints. Esquer has worked at PCC for seven years, and earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photography from UA in 2015.

Simmons-Myers credits Esquer’s dedication to photography, PCC and the Bernal project as the raison d’être of the exhibition.

The new prints will become a part of the permanent Bernal Archive at the UA Center for Creative Photography.

The Bernal Gallery is located in the Center for the Arts complex on West Campus.

The gallery and its programs are free and open to the public. The gallery is open Monday -Thursday 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Friday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. and before most evening performances in Center for the Arts theaters.

The exhibit will be closed on Veteran’s Day, Nov. 11, and during the Thanksgiving holiday, Nov 24-25.

Additional previously exhibited Bernal images are on display at the Tucson International Airport gallery through Jan. 27.

For more information, call 206-6942 or email centerforthearts@pima.edu.

 

FYI

Louis Carlos Bernal: Arizona Unseen, Color Photographs 1978-1988”

Where: West Campus Bernal Gallery

When: Through Dec. 9

Admission: Free

Details: 206-6942


"Untitled," Douglas, Arizona, 1979. Photography by Louis Carlos Bernal. Photograph from the Louis Carlos Bernal Archive at the Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona. © Lisa Bernal Brthour and Katrina Bernal, 2016.

“Untitled,” Douglas, Arizona, 1979. Photography by Louis Carlos Bernal. Photograph from the Louis Carlos Bernal Archive at the Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona.
© Lisa Bernal Brthour and Katrina Bernal, 2016.


"Untitled," El Mirage, Arizona, 1978. Photography by Louis Carlos Bernal. Photograph from the Louis Carlos Bernal Archive at the Center for Creative photography, University of Arizona. © Lisa Bernal Brethour and Katrina Bernal, 2016.

“Untitled,” El Mirage, Arizona, 1978. Photography by Louis Carlos Bernal. Photograph from the Louis Carlos Bernal Archive at the Center for Creative photography, University of Arizona.
© Lisa Bernal Brethour and Katrina Bernal, 2016.

THE WORD: Do you feel involved with Desert Vista?

THE WORD: Do you feel involved with Desert Vista?

Photos and interviews by Nicholas Trujillo at Desert Vista Campus

pg03-word-elias-lopez“The campus is really small and that’s what I like about it. It feels safe here. It feels like everyone here is more serious with what they want to do.”

Elias Lopez

Major: Welding

 

pg03-word-edwin-renck

 

 

 

 

 

 

I feel like I am really connected to the community but I attribute that to my job. I’m a tutor and I’m always talking with students that are coming and going.”

Edwin Renck

Major: Psychology

 

pg03-word-victoria-valencia

 

 

 

I feel like I’ve had a nice foundation and I’m building on that foundation. There are so many clubs here that people can get connected with.”

Victoria Valencia

Major: Orthondontics

 

 

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I feel very connected. When I came here on my first day, I was already signed up for Student Life so it’s a very welcoming community.”

Noah Spencer

Major: Film/acting

 

 

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Really connected. I started with Student Life and that’s like the gateway to everything in the community. Plus I joined TRIO, and that really helps as well.”

Ruben Meza

Major: Engineering

THE WORD: What are your craziest summer plans?

THE WORD: What are your craziest summer plans?

Photos and interviews by D.R. Williams on East Campus

“I’m going to spend the whole summer catching up on credits in math.” Celine Mickelson-Begic  Major: Digital arts

“I’m going to spend the whole summer catching up on credits
in math.”
Celine Mickelson-Begic
Major: Digital arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I’m going to Disneyland.” Eriq Ganshert  Major: Undecided

“I’m going to Disneyland.”
Eriq Ganshert
Major: Undecided

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I’m going skydiving in the Grand Canyon.” Esperanza Calderon Major: Nursing

“I’m going skydiving in the Grand Canyon.”
Esperanza Calderon
Major: Nursing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“My crazy days are over, I’ll just be teaching summer school.” Luis Leon PCC math instructor

“My crazy days are over, I’ll just be teaching summer school.”
Luis Leon
PCC math instructor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I’m going to San Diego and going to the beach.” Rachel Simpson Major: Nursing

“I’m going to San Diego and going to the beach.”
Rachel Simpson
Major: Nursing

 

THE WORD: How are you helping the environment?

THE WORD: How are you helping the environment?

Photos and interviews by Andres Chavira at East Campus

“Recently they put a recycling bin in my building and I also compost as much as I can.” Brandt Birkholm Major: Business

“Recently they put a recycling bin in my building and I also compost as much as I can.”
Brandt Birkholm
Major: Business

“I throw things into a recycling bin, I try not to use plastic as often and I also reuse a lot of it to make art projects.” Angelica Valenzuela Major: Fine Arts

“I throw things into a recycling bin, I try not to use plastic as often and I also reuse a lot of it to make art projects.”
Angelica Valenzuela
Major: Fine Arts

“I stay green by unplugging all electrical devices that I don’t need when I leave the house to conserve energy.” Max Bracamonte Major: Film and Media Production

“I stay green by unplugging all electrical devices that I don’t need when I leave the house to conserve energy.”
Max Bracamonte
Major: Film and Media Production

“I use a lot of old plastic containers again; my grandmother taught me to do that. I also do a lot of recycled material DIYs.” Naya Cordova Major: Nursing

“I use a lot of old plastic containers again; my grandmother taught me to do that. I also do a lot of recycled material DIYs.”
Naya Cordova
Major: Nursing

“When it comes to recycling, I usually reuse plastic containers and attend sustainability conventions in Tempe every year.” Arturo Noriega Major: Business Management

“When it comes to recycling,
I usually reuse plastic
containers and attend sustainability conventions
in Tempe every year.”
Arturo Noriega
Major: Business Management

THE WORD: How do you choose an instructor?

THE WORD: How do you choose an instructor?

“Go to ratemyprofessors.com and based off willingness to work with students.” Margaret Eubanks Major: Medical assistant

“Go to ratemyprofessors.com and based off willingness
to work with students.”
Margaret Eubanks
Major: Medical assistant

 

“I choose according to my schedule.” Nathan Carreno Major: Undecided

“I choose according
to my schedule.”
Nathan Carreno
Major: Undecided

 

“Word of mouth I find is the best advertisement so I would seek out other students and get their feedback.”  Marsha Greenwood-Schotz Major: Nursing

“Word of mouth I find is the
best advertisement so I would seek out other students
and get their feedback.”
Marsha Greenwood-Schotz
Major: Nursing

 

“Typically I might ask friends and go off of their suggestions. Other than that, I usually use ratemyprofessors.com.” Luis Morales Major: Mining engineer

“Typically I might ask friends and go off of their suggestions. Other than that, I usually use ratemyprofessors.com.”
Luis Morales
Major: Mining engineer

“First I eliminate campus locations and times that are not convenient. Then I look for the class that is filling up the fastest.” Gary Brostek Major: Accounting

“First I eliminate campus locations and times that
are not convenient. Then I look for the class that is filling
up the fastest.”
Gary Brostek
Major: Accounting

 

 

THE WORD: What was your worst spring break experience?

THE WORD: What was your worst spring break experience?

Photos and interviews by S. Paul Bryan

 

“I got really sick and was unable to go on spring break with my friends.” Ashley Alexander Major: Nursing

“I got really sick and was
unable to go on spring break with my friends.”
Ashley Alexander
Major: Nursing

Pg03-Word-Ethan D'Urso-sprigg

“My girlfriend and I broke up in the middle of spring break. That was definitely my worst spring break experience.” Ethan D’Urso-Sprigg Major: Undecided

Pg03-Word-Rachel Mothershed

“One spring break I had tons of homework. I was not able to enjoy the break to the fullest.” Rachel Mothershed Major: Dental assistant

Pg03-Word-Sofia Fuentes

“I had to work every day of spring break, eight hours a day. The worst is, I was working at Taco ‘Hell.’” Sofia Fuentes Major: Liberal arts

Pg03-Word-Victoria Villa

“I was forced to go to work and then go straight home and study for exams that I had to take as soon as spring break was over.” Victoria Villa Major: Radiology

THE WORD: What is your ideal Valentine’s Day?

THE WORD: What is your ideal Valentine’s Day?

photos and interviews by Melina Casillas on Desert Vista Campus

Pg03-Word-Mariah Zavala

“Spending time with loved ones and eating a lot of junk food.”

Mariah Zavala

Major: Associate of Science

Pg03-Word-David Fernandez

“A beach setup at sunset

with candles, a blanket.”

David Fernandez

Major: Business administration

Pg03-Word-Kelsey Ribbeck

“Something spontaneous,

as long as it’s not

‘Netflix’ and chilling.”

Kelsey Ribbeck

Major: Veterinary science

Pg03-Word-JuanPedro Ahumada

“Hiking up to Ramiro pools,

and then having a picnic.”

JuanPedro Ahumada

Major: Nanotechnology

Pg03-Word-Kari Fort

“A nice dinner where I’m able

to dress up, and then a movie.”

Kari Fort

Major: X-ray technician

THE WORD: Have you ever littered and why?

THE WORD: Have you ever littered and why?

Photos and interviews by D.R Williams on West Campus

 

Pg03-Word-Ashitari Perez

“When I was younger. I just never gave it a second thought.”

Ashitari Perez 

Major: Photography

 

Pg03-Word-Charles Loy

“I don’t litter. I pick up trash when I go hiking if I see it. “

Charles Loy

Major: Arts and Entertainment

 

Pg03-Word-Jacqueline Garcia

“Never. I’ve always tried to pick trash up when I see it.”

Jacqueline Garcia

Major: Marine Biology

 

Pg03-Word-Lucia Hernandez

“I only throw out biodegradable things to help the soil.”

Lucia Hernandez

Major: Science

 

Pg03-Word-Todd McBride.

“Laziness. I didn’t want trash in the car and I wasn’t stopping

Todd McBride

Major: Web Design

Top 10: Streetwear

Top 10: Streetwear

By ANDRES CHAVIRA

Fall/Winter 2015 was filled with a multitude of different clothing releases ranging in price, quality and style. With the recent increase in the amount of fashion conscious youth around the world it’s only fair that we look at the most memorable clothing drops of the last season.

10. Midnight Studios

Shane Gonzales, 20, teamed up with punk era photographer Steve Emberton to release his latest line. As always, Gonzales focused heavily on the quality, giving us a more contemporary oversized aesthetic.

9. Gosha Rubchinskiy

Designer Gosha Rubchinskiy has brought yet another new face to the ever-changing world of fashion. Strongly influenced by 90s era Russia, as well as the modern day skating subculture, Rubchinskiy brings a unique and refreshing look to the youth of today, and this release was no exception.

8. Palace Skateboards

London based skateboarding brand Palace has successfully planted both feet firmly in the skater subculture, as well as the streetwear scene. Palace continues to mature as a clothing brand moving from only displaying its “Tri-Ferg” logo to a much larger variety of well-executed designs.

7. Fear of God x Pacsun

Jerry Lorenzo’s first ever collaboration touched down this season with Pacsun. This collaboration offers the great quality and look of Lorenzo’s project, Fear of God, but made it more openly available for people since the prices were lower.

6. BAPE x PUMA

Classic sportswear brand PUMA collaborated with A Bathing Ape, one of the most iconic and influential streetwear brands to ever exist, and gave us yet another memorable collection.

5. Supreme x The North Face

Legendary skateboarding brand Supreme is known for its iconic collaborations, and this season was no different. Supreme and The North Face teamed up once again to give us yet another set of killer pieces that were sought after by hype beasts throughout the world.

4. Off-White

Designer Virgil Abloh released his third season with the brand Off-White, a truly eye-catching collection. This release gave off a very nostalgic and rural vibe. Although different from his past work, it fit well together.

3. H&M x Balmain

High fashion house Balmain and H&M joined forces to give us one of the greatest collaborations in recent times. The collaboration gave us all the amazing quality offered by the house while giving people an opportunity to purchase them at much lower prices.

2. YEEZY Season 1

Rapper and designer Kanye West joined forces with Adidas to release his first and highly anticipated collection named YEEZY Season 1. This collection was a very contemporary take on basics as well as a pair of athletic shoes and duck boots.

1. Raf Simons

Raf Simons’ most recent collection was one that instantly caught the attention of many. Simons took the beauty of our youth and subtly incorporated it into our adulthood creating a beautiful contrast.

Leftover Crack’s triumphant return

Leftover Crack’s triumphant return

By TRAVIS BRAASCH

Leftover Crack formed in 1998 after the breakup of political punk band Choking Victim. They’ve always played a style that fuses punk, ska, and hardcore together in a way that flows to create an urgent backdrop to the radically leftist nature of the lyrics.

Releasing their first full length record titled “Mediocre Generica” in 2001, followed by the well accepted “Fuck World Trade” in 2004, LOC continued to gain a stronger following with each release, despite the constant cloud surrounding the group due to their radical lifestyle of squatting.

Squatters are individuals who choose to occupy abandoned buildings or land and are stereotyped as substance abusers. Many also hold extreme leftist political views and practice an anarchist lifestyle. This is a group frequently overlooked by most of society, even though the New Internationalist social justice magazine reported in 2006 that there are an estimated 1 billion squatters worldwide.

“There’s a stigma with our band because of our politics, lifestyles and personalities,” said vocalist Scott “Stza” Sturgeon. “It boils down to the fact that people don’t like squatters.”

With twelve years since their last full-length release, LOC has had more time than some bands to work on a follow-up to a successful album. It immediately shows when listening to “Constructs Of The State,” released in 2015.

“It wasn’t like we took 11 years off, we were active the entire time,” said Brad Logan, guitarist and vocalist. “We released a split with Citizen Fish and toured in other bands, Rats In The Walls and Star Fucking Hipsters.”

Like many bands, LOC was under pressure after the success of “Fuck World Trade” to quickly put together a follow up album. Rather than rush into another project, the band toured and released an EP, taking time to put together new songs over the course of years instead of months.

“Everyone got to contribute within the band and we worked with people we admire, which has been great,”  Logan said.

“Constructs Of The State” features several guest appearances, such as Jesse Michaels of Operation Ivy and Common Rider Fame, who also directed the music video for the song “System Fucked” off of “Constructs Of The State.” The album also has songs featuring members of the Bouncing Souls, The Dead Milkmen and REIVERS.

“Because it was recorded in the Bay Area, a lot of our friends’ bands came to town,”  Stza said. “I think it is a great way to work. It couldn’t have happened if we  recorded this album in a month.”

While the music is as diverse as ever, fans of the band will devour the lyrics covering the band’s typical topics like police brutality, racism, homophobia, religion and living the squatter lifestyle. While many artists may talk about the lifestyle of punks and squatters, LOC speaks from experience.

“The topics I like to talk about won’t go away anytime soon, I shed light on them,” Stza said. “I don’t like to date the music or talk about current events. Hip-hop dates itself a lot, and songs can become irrelevant within a year.”

Due to the nature of the topics they choose to speak about, LOC have been in almost constant conflict with the police since their inception, especially in their hometown of New York City.

“The police are aware of our band and it can make it hard in places like New York where we have had trouble with the police constantly and promoters don’t want to deal with it and won’t book us,” Stza said.

Despite having trouble finding promoters and venues willing to book them, LOC have a constantly growing base of fans, many of whom are getting into punk music and politics for the first time. Though criticized for being a “gateway punk band,” LOC doesn’t see this as a bad thing.

“I’m proud to be called a gateway punk band,” said Stza. “We have a lot of young fans or people who got into our band at an early age. You shouldn’t hold important messages back because of fashion or who’s cool or isn’t.”

“It should be open to everybody,” said Logan. “We could provide a gateway into people checking us out and moving on to the bands that influenced us which we feel are far superior to our own band. Those ideas need to be out there.”

Besides living the lifestyle that they talk about in their music, the members of LOC are involved in politics, often playing for benefits or organizations that they support including No More Deaths, who work to stop the deaths of immigrants in the desert.

“I love Tucson. I’ve worked with No More Deaths for a few years now,” Stza said. “There was a no borders camp they had eight years ago that I went to and played for the US and Mexico sides of the border, as well as a small tour with No More Deaths.”

As active as they are, the members of LOC show no signs of slowing down anytime soon. They have a batch of songs that didn’t quite fit on “Constructs Of The State” that will be released as an EP later this year, as well as a busy tour schedule.

“We want to go to Japan, Australia, South Africa, the Middle East, Southeast Asia,” Stza said. “I want to hit anywhere that will have us.”

For more information on LOC, visit leftovercrack.rocks.

Chris Mann, Brad Logan, Scott Sturgeon, Donny Morris and Alec Crack of Leftover Crack pose for a photo. (Photo courtesy of Leftover Crack)

THE WORD: Which music genre motivates you the most?

THE WORD: Which music genre motivates you the most?

Pg03-Anmol

“When I’m studying, I listen to symphonies by Schubert because they have no lyrics in them.”

Anmol Jain

Major: Computer Science

Pg03-Ariela

“I grew up listening to jazz. It helps me focus and relax myself.”

Ariela Edelman

Major: Medical Lab Tech

Pg03-Jonathan

“Anything hardcore or heavy, like hip-hop or metal.” 

Jonathan Vasquez

Major: Dental Hygiene

Pg03-Kaity

“It varies. Whatever fits my mood that day.”

Kaity Lopiccolo

Major: Nursing

Pg03-Tyler

“While I work out, I generally listen to something uptempo that I can sing along with to keep me going.”

Tyler Mercer

Major: Undecided