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FROM THE ARCHIVES: Global Art Project celebrates 20th anniversary

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Global Art Project celebrates 20th anniversary

Editor’s note: This regular feature explores topics discussed in past issues of the Aztec Press.

By SIERRA J. RUSSELL

When Katherine Josten formed the Global Art Project 20 years ago, she was a Pima Community College instructor seeking a way to unite people from around the world.

Her idea began to take shape in the spring of 1994 as she worked with fellow artists and collaborators to organize the first Global Art Project.

Within six years, the project had grown to such an extent that Josten decided to resign from teaching to dedicate more time to the nonprofit organization.

Josten said it was a sacrifice because she thoroughly enjoyed working with students and faculty at PCC for more than a decade. However, she was ready to commit to the growing vision.

GAP takes place every two years and continues to expand its reach. Today there are 87 countries involved, with recent additions including East Timor, Bulgaria and Peru.

The process involves participants from around the world who submit a piece of art that represents their image of peace and unity. Josten and fellow coordinators handle an assortment of mediums.

Approximately half of the submissions come from children. They are typically collected by the end of February, and exchanged near the end of April to coincide with Earth Day.

The Aztec Press interviewed Josten about GAP in 1994.

“It’s a perfect way of expressing that we are all one,” she said. “It’s also a way for all people to connect, by putting an idea in the physical form.”

GAP’s aim is to connect participants from one household to another. It begins by pairing participants, typically based on the geography and age of contributors. The size of a group may range from two to 2,000.

Each participant creates artwork and displays it locally in coffee shops, libraries or anywhere the artist deems suitable.

The artist then exchanges with another contributor as a symbol of connection and peace. Artists are encouraged to include a photo and/or personal note for their recipient. Recipients can display the artwork or take their newly acquired gift home. A digital copy is stored in the GAP Art Bank.

There is no official exhibit scheduled in Tucson this year.

Josten recently spoke with Arizona Public Media about the project’s evolution. She said GAP has become more involved with schools, ranging from kindergarten to the graduate level.

Many teachers find participation to be a valuable tool that demonstrates the importance of self expression and global harmony.

“Peace is so needed, especially at this time when there is so much change going on,” Josten said. “We can’t find peace within this world until we find peace within ourselves.”

Josten encourages anyone interested to start planning for the 2016 exchange. Organization will begin in 2015.

She admits that even with 200 regional coordinators, administration of such a vast program can be a hassle.

However, when Josten sees the works submitted and hears the stories of their creation, her enthusiasm is renewed.

For more information about future submissions and upcoming events, visit globalartproject.org. Information is also available at facebook.com/GlobalArtProject.

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Artist Maggie Matthews sent this painting from the United Kingdom to Tucson. The local recipient displayed the art in the Downtown Library.

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THE WORD: What would you pick for a last meal?

THE WORD: What would you pick for a last meal?

Azalea Morha

 

“Menudo. It has a lot of fatand stuff but it wouldn’t matter anymore.”

Azalea Morhaim

 

 

Scott Rebeck

 

“I’m just a steak and potatoes guy. It’s my all-time favorite meal.”

Scott Rebeck

 

Andria Pellesh

 

“Linguini and clams with a glass of pinot grigio wine.”

Andria Pelleshia

 

Patrick Brock

 

“Just a cheeseburger for me. I could probably eat one for every meal.”

Patrick Brock

 

Sam Mulla

 

“Gumbo! Mardi Gras is my favorite holiday and it just kind of reminds me of that.”

Sam Mulla

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FROM THE ARCHIVES: States debate freedom of religious beliefs

FROM THE ARCHIVES: States debate freedom of religious beliefs

Editor’s note: This regular feature explores topics covered in past issues of Aztec Press. This column is the second part of a two-part series.

By SIERRA J. RUSSELL

Students and employees at Pima Community College represent a wide range of religious beliefs. This is seen in the pages of the Aztec Press dating back to its earliest issues.

The newspaper featured an interview in the late ‘70s with instructor Donald A. Graham, who practiced Sufism, a form of mysticism with Islamic roots.

“At some point, every being will feel a sense of emptiness and will begin to seek something to fill that emptiness,” Graham said. “It is then he will turn to a spiritual path.”

Graham explained that Sufis are open to various paths of enlightenment.

“The real unity of Sufism is the realization that everything is a part of the same thing,” he said.

Like many religions, Sufism encourages self-discipline and sacrifice of frivolities and indulgences.

A 1992 article focused on the presence of Hare Krishna members at West Campus. They were handing out pamphlets, accepting donations for copies of the Bhagavad Gita and chanting in the gym courtyard.

“Chanting is a recommended process of self-realization for this day and age,” said Vaishnava Swami, a Hare Krishna member from the Chaitanya Cultural Center.

PCC students provided mixed opinions about their presence.

One student said he enjoyed the chanting and thought the members added “a little atmosphere to the campus.”

Another student considered the Hare Krishna members loud and distracting. He also found their appearance “too freaky.”

A second  article from 1992 looked into the Tucson chapter of American Atheist Veterans. PCC student Orin R. “Spike” Tyson had recently been named head of the local branch.

“An atheist is someone who does not have a set of beliefs,” Tyson said. “If you said ‘one plus one equals two,’ I’d ask you to prove it. We demand proof of anything.”

Tyson said there were laws in place to protect many religious beliefs, but the laws often left atheists without protection.

He cited Article 19 of the Arkansas Constitution, which does not allow atheists to hold office or testify in court. The restriction is still in place today.

Provisions in several other state constitutions also prohibit atheists from being elected.

For instance, Section 2, Article 9 of Tennessee’s state constitution reads, “No person who denies the being of God, or a future state of rewards and punishments, shall hold any office in the civil department of this state.”

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer’s recent veto of the controversial Senate Bill 1062 speaks volumes about the ongoing debate concerning religious rights.

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THE WORD: What was your best April Fools prank?

THE WORD: What was your best April Fools prank?

Pg03-Word-Gabriel Gudenkauf

 

“My friends and I in high school got to school really early and painted a fake crime scene.

We splattered a bunch of fake blood around a body outline and freaked everyone out.”

Gabriel Gudenkauf
Major: Science

 

Pg03-Word-Gertrude Donovan

 

“My boyfriend and I told his parents I was pregnant.We printed a fake sonogram and everything.

When we told them it was a joke, they started crying.”

Gertrude Donovan
Major: Public health

 

Pg03-Word-Rodney Haywood

 

“My little brother put syrup on the toilet seat. I woke up at seven in the morning to use the bathroom and didn’t even notice it.

I then wondered why my ass was stuck to the seat.”

Rodney Haywood
Major: Visual Performing Arts

 

Pg03-Word-Karson Krieg

 

“My best friend in high school told me she was transferring schools to join an elite choir program.

I found it strange since the school was in Marana and we went to Sahuaro High School.”

Karson Krieg
Major: Music education

 

Pg03-Word-George Smith

 

“This girl told me she was pregnant after I only smashed her once.

She even showed me some other girl’s pregnancy test that was positive.”

George Smith
Major: Chemistry

 

Photos and interviews by Robert Hernandez on West Campus

 

 

 

 

 

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FROM THE ARCHIVES: Religious practices make headlines

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Religious practices make headlines

Editor’s note: This regular feature explores topics covered in past issues of Aztec Press. Today’s column is the first in a two-part series.

By SIERRA J. RUSSELL

The recent controversy over SB 1062 has brought the question of religious practices back to the forefront of public debate.

Religious freedom has been a highly debated topic dating back to the earliest issues of the Aztec Press.

An article from January 1974 featured an interview with Bill Lowery, a preacher and coordinator of “Christ is the Answer,” a nonprofit street ministry and traveling commune. The ministry was reportedly welcome in Tucson during its brief stay.

Lowery traveled with a team of about 200 people, including his family, and a tent the size of a football field.

He explained that only half of the tent was set up in Tucson because of relatively low attendance.

“We thrive on donations,” Lowery said. “The other night we took in $32 for a collection. Try feeding 200 people on $32. We find that every day is a miracle.”

As the group trekked from city to city, some new recruits joined the ministry while others departed. Lowery said some members would leave quietly in the middle of the night.

“Usually they do so because they can’t take the rough living, they didn’t count on the cost or they don’t get enough privacy,” he said.

The ministry included The Joyful Noise, one of the first Christian bands to incorporate electric guitar. It attempted to appeal to the younger generation.

A 1978 article focused on controversial disciplinary methods in a youth home run by Texas evangelist Lester Roloff.

Several teenage girls from Pima County had been sent to Roloff’s Rebekah Home in Corpus Christi, Texas.

They told their parents that disciplinary measures used in the house included solitary confinement. There were also reports from other girls about severe whippings with leather belts.

Roloff denied the harsh whippings. However, after a court hearing in 1973 he publicly declared, “better a pink bottom than a black soul.”

The evangelist spoke at a press conference in the Tucson City Council chambers about the Pima County teenagers. “The first thing we do is brainwash them because their brains are dirty, but we use the King James washcloth,” he said.

Roloff also said that brainwashing is common in our society and media is the main instrument of accepted influence. He also claimed that “children do not have any rights as long as they are wrong.”

The Rebekah House had been temporarily shut down in 1973 for failure to comply with government licensing standards. Roloff’s arguments citing religious freedom failed to stand up in court.

In the years that followed, Roloff’s methods were publicly scrutinized by some and supported by others. Some programs he launched decades ago remain in operation today.

Part 2: Religious beliefs.

 

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BY THE NUMBERS: Spring Break

BY THE NUMBERS: Spring Break

Compiled by Will Willcoxson

 

1936*

Year the first spring break took place, according to Time magazine. A swimming coach from Colgate University in New York took his team to Fort Lauderdale to stay in shape.

 

20,000*

Estimated number of spring break participants in Fort Lauderdale in 1959.

 

450,000*

Estimated number of spring break participants in Fort Lauderdale in 2011.

 

1986*

Year that “MTV’s Spring Break” premiered. The annual tradition continues today.

 

18*

Legal drinking age in Mexico, hence the popularity of spring break trips to the country.

 

$600*

Low-end cost for a three-day vacation in Mexico.

 

$1 billion**

Estimated amount spent during the spring break period.

 

5,220**

Number of alcohol-related arrests during spring break in Florida in 2004.

 

80**

Percentage of parents who worry their kids will drink over the break.

 

10**

Average number of drinks that female spring breakers consume daily.

 

76**

Percentage of males who intend to have sex with someone they meet over the break.

 

Sources:

*http://news.yahoo.com/spring-break-numbers-20110311-123400-299.html

**trutv.com/shows/party_heat/spring_break_facts.htmlLogo - Aztec Press

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The Word: What are your plans for spring break?

The Word: What are your plans for spring break?

Christopher Corrington

“I’m going to Disneyland with friends.”

Christopher Corrington

Major: Business

Christina Andrews

“I will be studying for my veterinary tech exam.”

Christina Andrews

Major: Veterinary Technician

Eric Mcneely

“I will probably spend some time with my girlfriend.”

Eric McNeely

Major: Anthropology

Tyrene Daoey

“I’m going to SeaWorld, the San Diego Zoo and Balboa Park.”

Tyrene Daoey

Major: Nursing

Steve Smith

“Calculus and chemistry homework, then I might see the movie ‘Divergent.’”

Steve Smith

Major: Aerospace Engineering

Interviews and photos by Will Willcoxson at Northwest Campus

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Upward Bound gives teens a boost

Upward Bound gives teens a boost

By JAMIE VERWYS

Upward Bound students seemed unfazed by the presence of a famous drug cartel member as they enjoyed snacks during a Pima Community College family night celebration Feb. 24.

In fact, the teens asked the celebrity for autographs.

The visitor was Lou Pimber, an actor best known for his role as a cartel henchman in AMC’s hit show “Breaking Bad.”

As a demo reel of Pimber’s work ended, he took the stage at Downtown Campus to provide motivational words of advice.

“I had powerful mentors in my life who spoke and I always knew I wanted to pay it forward,” Pimber said. “My message is always, you can’t let a bad past be an indicator of your future.”

Upward Bound is a federally funded program that helps high school students from low income families pursue higher education. Participants are first-generation college students, the first in their family to attend college.

Downtown Campus works with teens from Amphitheater, Presidio and Rincon high schools.

“This area of Tucson is one of the worst off in the country,” Upward Bound Program Manager Lyn Olsen said. “The median family income is about $15,000. Our students deal with a lot of issues but they are very motivated and want a better life.”

Upward Bound provides a wealth of resources for members to utilize. The 60 teens enrolled at Downtown Campus are required to volunteer in the community, take classes over the summer and keep their grades up.

Their time and dedication earns them free tutoring, assistance with scholarships, practice with standardized testing, counseling and cultural field trips. As long as students meet participation requirements, they may receive a stipend for their classes.

Olsen stressed the program’s high level of involvement by parents.

“They are key to everything,” Olsen said. “I found the No. 1 reason why students succeed in school and go on to college is mom.”

Pima honored the families participating in Upward Bound by hosting the family night.

Actor Lou Pimber addresses teens enrolled in Upward Bound at Downtown Campus. (Aztec Press photo by Jamie Verwys)

Actor Lou Pimber addresses teens enrolled in Upward Bound at Downtown Campus. (Aztec Press photo by Jamie Verwys)

The age-diverse crowd was welcomed into the Amethyst Room with lively music and an assortment of snacks. As students and parents took their seats, Pimber mingled comfortably among them.

Pimber has called Tucson home since a childhood spent on the city’s south side. Before his journey into film, he served in the Army and in law enforcement.

While working as an undercover drug and gang task force agent, Pimber was attacked by a fellow law enforcement officer. The physical and emotional injury led to his retirement.

In 2006, the Mexican cable network Cablé Vision set his acting career into motion. Due to his knowledge of weapons and self-defense, Pimber was brought on as a technical advisor. He later found himself in front of the camera for a small role.

Pimber is currently working on two television shows called “Gang Related” and “Talk of Tucson.”

High school students interested in the Upward Bound program may visit pima.edu for more information and application packets.

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FROM THE ARCHIVES Argument over religious freedom has deep roots

FROM THE ARCHIVES Argument over religious freedom has deep roots

Editor’s note: This regular feature explores topics covered in past issues of Aztec Press. Today’s column is the first in a two-part series.

 

By SIERRA J. RUSSELL

The recent controversy over SB 1062 has brought the question of religious practices back to the forefront of public debate.

Religious freedom has been a highly debated topic dating back to the earliest issues of the Aztec Press.

An article from January 1974 featured an interview with Bill Lowery, a preacher and coordinator of “Christ is the Answer,” a nonprofit street ministry and traveling commune. The ministry was reportedly welcome in Tucson during its brief stay.

Lowery traveled with a team of about 200 people, including his family, and a tent the size of a football field.

He explained that only half of the tent was set up in Tucson because of relatively low attendance.

“We thrive on donations,” Lowery said. “The other night we took in $32 for a collection. Try feeding 200 people on $32. We find that every day is a miracle.”

As the group trekked from city to city, some new recruits joined the ministry while others departed. Lowery said some members would leave quietly in the middle of the night.

“Usually they do so because they can’t take the rough living, they didn’t count on the cost or they don’t get enough privacy,” he said.

The ministry included The Joyful Noise, one of the first Christian bands to incorporate electric guitar. It attempted to appeal to the younger generation.

A 1978 article focused on controversial disciplinary methods in a youth home run by Texas evangelist Lester Roloff.

Several teenage girls from Pima County had been sent to Roloff’s Rebekah Home in Corpus Christi, Texas.

They told their parents that disciplinary measures used in the house included solitary confinement. There were also reports from other girls about severe whippings with leather belts.

Roloff denied the harsh whippings. However, after a court hearing in 1973 he publicly declared, “better a pink bottom than a black soul.”

The evangelist spoke at a press conference in the Tucson City Council chambers about the Pima County teenagers. “The first thing we do is brainwash them because their brains are dirty, but we use the King James washcloth,” he said.

Roloff also said that brainwashing is common in our society and media is the main instrument of accepted influence. He also claimed that “children do not have any rights as long as they are wrong.”

The Rebekah House had been temporarily shut down in 1973 for failure to comply with government licensing standards. Roloff’s arguments citing religious freedom failed to stand up in court.

In the years that followed, Roloff’s methods were publicly scrutinized by some and supported by others. Some programs he launched decades ago remain in operation today.

Next issue: Religious beliefs.

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The Word: What kind of candy would you be?

The Word: What kind of candy would you be?

 

The word Sarah Bravard

“I’d be a Reece’s Peanut Butter Cup because they’re addicting, like me.”

Sarah Bravard

Major: Undeclared

The Word Hunter young

 

“I would be M&Ms because they have variety.”

Hunter Young

Major: Undeclared

The Word Jennie Gonnsen

 

“I would be a toffee bar because I’m sweet.”

Jennie Gonnsen

Major: Undeclared

The Word Ben Diaz

 

“A Butterfinger because they’re tasty and I’m always dropping things.”

Ben Diaz

Major: Science

Angie Jackson The Word

 

“I would be a Snickers because I’m sometimes sweet, sometimes nutty.”

Angie Jackson

Major: Undeclared

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By the numbers: Tucson weather

Compiled by David Del Grande

117° F

Highest temperature ever recorded

6° F

Lowest temperature ever recorded

71.4° F

Average annual high temperature

90.6° F

Highest monthly average temperature.(July)

65.0° F

Average annual low temperature

41.2° F

Lowest monthly average temperature (January)

60.1° F

Average temperature for March

3.93 in.

Most rain recorded during 24 hours

7.93 in.

Most rainfall in one month

24.17 in.

Most rainfall in one year

6.8 in.

Most snow recorded in one day

99° F

Hottest day in March

20° F

Coldest day in March

Source:

nws.noaa.gov/climate/local_data.php?wfo=twc

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THE WORD: What was your worst Valentine’s date?

THE WORD: What was your worst Valentine’s date?

Photos and interviews by Ebony Stoglin on Desert Vista Campus

 Leah Olsen

“He ended up taking me to a mutual friend’s house. He was playing video games and I got to watch him on the couch.”

Leah Olsen

Major: Nursing

Antonio Luna

“We were walking around and talking, and all of a sudden it started raining.”

Antonio Luna

Major: Culinary Arts

Richard Lopez

“We went out to eat Sonoran hot dogs and I was already full. I threw up and that was the last time I went on a date with her.”

Richard Lopez

Major: Liberal Arts

Zimar Dupree

“My friend is a horrible wing man. He told me he was bringing a girl for me to go on a date with and she wasn’t my type at all.”

Zimar Dupree

Major: Undecided

Shelly Bowen

“Me and my boyfriend got into a huge fight. I didn’t know he had already planned a trip to Vegas for us. I felt so stupid after he told me.”

Shelly Bowen

Major: Dental Hygiene

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FROM THE ARCHIVES: Learn warning signs for abusive relationships

Editor’s note: This regular column explores topics covered in past editions of Aztec Press.

By SIERRA J. RUSSELL

Some people celebrate Valentine’s Day, while others see the holiday end in conflict. Relationships require patience, communication and, in many cases, an unbiased referee.

In 1976, an Aztec Press reporter interviewed two women who had recently been divorced. At the time, divorce procedures were becoming almost as common as weddings.

One of the women interviewed had married at 19. Initially, she viewed marriage as a “declaration of freedom from her parents.”

Eventually, she saw the union as damaging to her livelihood and decided to part ways with her husband of eight years.

“The divorce procedure was like an appointment,” she said. “It lasted a couple of minutes with others waiting in line.”

She said their two daughters spent each summer with their father.

“My own personal experience with him has nothing to do with the girls,” she explained. “Our feelings are stored up, but we don’t let them out.”

The other woman spoke of her ex-husband’s violent behavior, which was linked to his drinking habit.

“I hated him … now I feel sorry for him,” she said. “I really don’t blame him. His father was just like him. He would beat his wife, was a heavy drinker, adulterer and he never talked to his kid.”

In 1992, the Aztec Press spoke with Karen Jaskar, a program assistant at the Brewster Center, a local shelter for battered women and their children.

Jaskar provided guidelines on how to identify and avoid abusive relationships:

  • Trust your instincts. If something feels wrong, it probably is.
  • Maintain a healthy support system. Keep your job, your friends and your focus on studies even if your partner encourages you to sacrifice these values.
  • Listen to the honest opinions of friends and family that you trust. Often when we are smitten with someone, it is difficult to see hazardous behavior clearly.
  • Work on strengthening your self-esteem by spending time with people that make you feel good about yourself. Also factor time in for solitude and self-reflection.
  • Do not depend on your partner to “cure” you. In times of stress or confusion, avoid seeking solace in drugs or alcohol. Try instead to engage in physical activity that will help your mind and body feel better, such as hiking or a new yoga class.
  • Do not be afraid or ashamed to seek professional help.

“Domestic violence can occur in married, unmarried, straight or gay relationships, in the foothills or in the barrio,” Jaskar said.

She explained that batterers are typically jealous and possessive, and can switch from charming to furious without warning.

They rarely accept responsibility for any faults, instead placing blame on others. They tend to undermine their partner’s accomplishments and attempt to control their actions.

As the relationship progresses, abusers tries to isolate their mate from friends and family, criticizing anyone who might voice concerns that the relationship is unhealthy and dangerous.

“Abusers put up a good false front and want to be seen as an upstanding person in the community,” Jaskar said. “Batterers have a great interest in keeping the abuse a secret.”

Due to such denial and secrecy, the abuser rarely seeks help for his or her violent behavior.

“It is the victim who is most likely to break the cycle of abuse by asking for outside help,” Jaskar said.

Domestic violence rarely ends without some type of outside intervention, she added.

“Remember, taking care of yourself is your responsibility. So is keeping your eyes open. That way, when Mr. Right does come along, you won’t be busy fielding punches from Mr. Wrong.”

The Brewster Center is still in operation today. More information can be found at brewstercenter.org or by calling 520-881-3063.

Another Tucson shelter that offers help and guidance is the Emerge Center, emergecenter.org. It has a 24 hour hotline: 1-888-428-0101.

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Sparks fly at contest

Sparks fly at contest

Local high school students put their welding and automotive skills to the test at Pima Community College’s Downtown Campus Feb. 7-8 in two Skills USA competitions. The events took place at the welding lab and the automotive lab.

Pg09-Main welding

High schooler Patsy Ortega competes under watchful eyes and a “Think Safety When Welding” sign.
(Aztec Press photos by Nellie Silva)

Pg09-Logo

The welding lab at Pima Community College’s Downtown Campus sports a welded copper PCC logo

Pg09-Sparks

A high school student wears a protective jacket while welding during the Skills USA competition

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Festivals: karats, cows, cars, crafts

Festivals: karats, cows, cars, crafts

Compiled by Jay Becker-Norman

Take a break from the frozen excitement of the Winter Olympics and check out all that is happening in sunny Tucson during February.

Tucson Gem and Mineral Show – Feb. 13-16

See a wealth of jewels and gems valued in the millions of dollars as the Tucson Gem and Mineral Show celebrates “60 Years of Diamonds, Gems, Silver and Gold” at the Tucson Convention Center, 260 S. Church Ave.

Admission is $10, with discounts available. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. on Feb. 13-15 and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on Feb. 16.

Details: tgms.org

La Fiesta de los Vaqueros – Feb. 15-23
Rodeo Parade – Feb. 20

Join in celebrating the cowboy by putting on your jeans and your best flannel and swinging your partner out to “La Fiesta de los Vaqueros.”

The rodeo features barrel racing, steer wrestling and bovines galore at the Tucson Rodeo Grounds, 4823 S. Sixth Ave. Daily admission prices range from $12-$26, and parking costs $5. Find a complete schedule of daily events on the rodeo website.

If nothing else, catch the 89th annual Rodeo Parade on Feb. 20. The 200-float parade kicks off at 9 a.m. at Park Avenue and Ajo Way, and continues south along Park to Irvington Road.

Street viewing is free, but come early to get a good spot. Call 294-1280 for reserved grandstand seats on Irvington Road at South Sixth Avenue. Tickets cost $7 for adults and $5 for children under 13.

Details: tucsonrodeo.com, tusconrodeoparade.com or 741-2233

Pg09-Rodeo clown

A rodeo clown entertains the crowds
(Larry Gaurano/Aztec Press 2013)

 

Classic Car Show & Blues Festival – Feb. 22

Race to Oro Valley to see antique, muscle and classic cars and trucks. You can also enjoy tunes from live blues bands and DJs, and purchase barbecue and other food.

The car show will take place from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Oro Valley Marketplace, located at the southwest corner of Tangerine and Oracle roads. Admittance is $5, with proceeds benefitting the Southern Arizona Arts and Cultural Alliance.

Details: 797-3959

Peace Fair & Music Festival – Feb. 22

The Tucson Peace Center has selected a “Climate Justice” theme for its 32nd annual festival. Enjoy live music, table vendors, children’s activities and entertainment at the Reid Park Bandshell, near 22nd Street and Country Club Road. Hours are 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

Details: tucsonpeacecalendar.org or 445-4110

Southwest Indian Art Fair – Feb. 22-23

Browse the work of 200-plus native artists during the Southwest Indian Art Fair at the Arizona State Museum, 1013 E. University Blvd. on the University of Arizona campus.

See pottery, paintings, jewelry, baskets, rugs and blankets displays, and experience the music, dance performances and demonstrations that integrate these living culture practices with the artist’s work.

Hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on Feb. 22 and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Feb. 23. Advance tickets are available through the museum website for $10. Students with a college ID and youth under age 18 get in free.

Details: statemuseum.arizona.edu or 626-6302

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