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HOROSCOPE

HOROSCOPE

By ZACK LEDESMA

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec 21)

Sometimes it seems like nobody cares about your feelings, Sagittarius. Try to confront people about it, though be aware they’ll probably agree.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan 19)

As a leader, Capricorn, you want things your way or not at all. Many people would admire you for your confidence if your ideas weren’t so bad.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

Your sarcasm is getting old, Aquarius. Do you even know you’re being sarcastic or is that just how you talk?

Pisces (Feb.19-March 20)

Everyone calls you lazy but if you think about it, is that really a bad thing? Yes it is, Pisces. Get off your butt.

Aries (March 21-April 19)

Your life has not been going great, Aries. But don’t beat yourself up about it. Blame it on others and beat them up.

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

You might be given the opportunity to be a leader but are you really pulling the strings, Taurus? Who cares if a false sense of importance gets you through the day.

Gemini (May 21-June 21)

Like a leaf in the wind, Gemini, you act on a whim. But an autumn leaf is really brittle. Someone’s foot will destroy you.

Cancer (June 22- July 22)

Winter brings dry skin and cracked hands, Cancer. Put on some lotion, you moody, clingy, self-pitying, oversensitive, self-absorbed human being.

Leo (July 23- Aug. 22)

You can’t talk to anyone about anything without making it sound insufferably pretentious, Leo. That’s it. I’m just calling you out.

Virgo (Aug. 23- Sept. 22)

It’s cuddle weather, Virgo, but you have no one to cuddle with. The weather matches your attitude: cold.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Oh Libra. You can’t decide who to take to the big high school dance. You do realize that you really shouldn’t be going to high school dances, right?

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

You manipulate everyone’s lives like a puppeteer to get what you want. But have you ever met a cool puppeteer? No, freaking nerd.

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‘Spamalot’ auditions Dec. 1-3

The Pima Community College theater department will hold auditions for its spring musical, “Monty Python’s Spamalot,” Dec. 1-3 in the West Campus Black Box Theatre from 6 p.m. until late each night.

Any PCC student is welcome to audition. Applicants must be present at all three auditions to be considered for a part.

Dec. 1: Dance audition

  • Wear comfortable clothes and appropriate shoes.
  • A short routine will be taught, then assigned groups of 10 will perform the routine.

Dec. 2: Singing audition

  • Choose an appropriate song from a musical.
  • Sixteen bars is recommended, and 32 bars is the maximum.
  • Bring sheet music for piano accompaniment. (A cappella not recommended.)

Dec. 3: Acting audition

  • Read from provided sides.
  • Sides will be available on Monday night.

The cast list will be posted the morning of Dec 4. First rehearsal is Dec. 5 at 6 p.m., with introductions, script handout and first read-through. The show will run Feb. 26-March 8.

For more information, contact Todd Poelstra at tpoelstra@pima.edu.

 

-By Katie Stewart

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BEST BETS

BEST BETS

Holiday events fill calendar

Compiled by Katie Stewart

‘Tis the season to enjoy Tucson festivities with the entire family. Look for additional listings at visittucson.org.

Thanksgiving Cross-country Classic

Nov. 27

Spend Thanksgiving day sprinting a European-style 5K around Reid Park or simply cheer on the runners as they hurdle water jumps and bales of hay. The Southern Arizona Road Runners will award turkeys to the top finishers, while runners-up in each age group receive pies. Awards are also given to the top men’s and women’s teams. The event begins at 8 a.m. for the women’s 5K, 8:45 a.m. for men’s 5K and 9:30 a.m. for a co-ed 1.5-mile fun run. Reid Park is located at Country Club Road and North 22nd Street.

Details: azroadrunners.org

Holiday Nights at Tohono Chul

Nov. 28-29, Dec. 5-6, Dec. 12-13

Celebrate the holidays surrounded by a million twinkling lights at Tohono Chul from 5:30-8:30 p.m. on your choice of six nights over three weekends. Admission includes live music, plus complimentary cookies and hot cocoa. Beer, wine and additional snacks will be available for purchase. Buy tickets online or at the admissions window. General admission costs $15, and tickets for children under 12 cost $2. Tohono Chul is located at 7366 N. Paseo del Norte.

Details: tohonochulpark.org

Luminaria Nights

Dec. 5, 6, 7 and Dec. 12, 13, 14

Tucson Botanical Gardens hosts Luminaria Nights for six evenings from 5:30-8:30 p.m., dazzling visitors with thousands of luminarias and twinkling lights. Other treats include live music, decorated holiday trees, Santa Claus and food trucks. Admission costs $12 for adults and $6 for children. Tucson Botanical Gardens is located at 2150 N. Alvernon Way.

Details: tucsonbotanical.org

Zoo Lights

Dec. 5-23

Reid Park Zoo uses light displays, animal-themed light sculptures, thousands of sparkling bulbs and falling snow to make Zoo Lights a Tucson holiday tradition nightly from 6-8 p.m. Cookies are provided and hot cocoa is available for $1. Tickets can be purchased online. Admission costs $6 for adults and $4 for children ages 2-14, with children under 2 admitted free.

Details: reidparkzoo.org

Tamal & Heritage Festival

Dec. 6

The 10th annual Tucson Tamal & Heritage Festival returns to AVA Amphitheater from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. In addition to purchasing flavorful tamales, visitors can enjoy a full day of live entertainment, art and culture. Festival admission is free. Casino del Sol is located at 7406 S. Camino del Oeste.

Details: casinodelsolresort.com/events/tamal-festival-2014

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ARTS BRIEFS

ARTS BRIEFS

Four December concerts on tap

Compiled by Katie Stewart

Pima Community College will host four concerts in six days at the West Campus Center for the Arts Proscenium Theatre.

Tickets for each concert cost $6, with discounts available. Box office hours are Tuesday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. and one hour before performances.

For more information, call the box office at 206-6986 or visit pima.edu/cfa.

Jazz Ensemble

Dec. 2 at 7:30 p.m.

The PCC Jazz Ensemble’s winter concert, directed by Mike Kuhn, will feature big band music of all styles with many instrumentalists in solo roles.

Program selections include:

  • Count Basie’s “Moten Swing” arranged by Ernie Wilkins.
  • Benny Golson’s “Killer Joe” arranged by Al Casagrande.
  • Miles Davis’ “Milestones” arranged by Dave Barduhn.
  • Bob Dourough’s “Comin’ Home Baby” arranged by Roger Holmes.

Vocalist Rachel Peterson will sing Dave Wolpe’s arrangement of Gershwin’s “Our Love Is Here To Stay” and “I Only Have Eyes For You,” arranged by PCC trombonist Roger Wallace.

Kuhn will perform one of his compositions, the Latin-flavored “Don’t Look Now,” in a small combo format.

Wind Ensemble

Dec. 4 at 7:30 p.m.

The PCC Wind Ensemble, under the direction of Mark Nelson, will perform an eclectic selection of band pieces in its final fall semester concert. Woodwind, brass and percussion ensembles will be featured throughout the concert.

The diverse program begins with “Procession of the Nobles” by Nicholas Rimsky-Korsakov, followed by a rousing rendition of the rarely heard “March of the Women Marines” by Louis Saverino.

The concert will continue with the band standard “Prelude, Siciliano and Rondo” by Malcom Arnold, then fly into a hip concert band version of “Birdland” by Josef Zawinal.

It will flow on with the melodic “River of Life” by Steven Reineke, followed by the popular “Pirates of the Caribbean” symphonic suite by Klaus Badlet.

Finally, as tradition dictates, the band will usher in the holiday season with “Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson.

Chorale & College Singers

Dec. 5 at 7:30 p.m.

“Love, Hope and Joy” will be the theme for a winter concert by the PCC Chorale & College Singers, under the direction of Jonathan Ng. The program will feature choral standards followed by sacred music and holiday selections.

The Chorale, a large mixed-voice choir, will open the program. Selections include:

  • “Old American Songs” by Aaron Copland.
  • “In the Bleak Midwinter” by Gustav Holst.
  • “Love Changes Everything” from Aspects of Love by Andrew Lloyd Webber.
  • Irish folk song “Danny Boy” arranged by Joseph Flummerfelt.

The College Singers, a select mixed-voice a cappella choir, will herald a season of hope with:

  • “The Shepherd’s Farewell” from L’enfance du Christ, Op. 25 by Hector Berlioz.
  • “Cantate Domino” by Giuseppe O. Pitoni.
  • “Tecum principium” (trio) from Christmas Oratorio by Saint-Saëns.
  • “Shepherd Chorus” from Amahl and the Night Visitors by Giano-Carlo Menotti.

Male singers from both choirs will perform “Standchen, D920” by Franz Schubert.

The concert will conclude with both choirs singing holiday selections, including:

  • “Hymn to the Virgin” by Benjamin Britten.
  • “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel” accompanied by a viola solo arranged by John Ferguson.
  • “Christmas Day” by Gustav Holst.
  • “In Dulci Jubilo” with two trumpets and double chorus by Samuel Scheidt.

Orchestra

Dec. 7 at 3 p.m.

PCC’s Orchestra, under the direction of Alexander Tentser, will perform a new program of orchestral masterpieces. Selections include:

  • “Symphony in C Major” by George Bizet.
  • “Dance Macabre” and “French Military March” by Camille Saint-Saëns.
  • “From the New World” symphony by Antonin Dvorak.
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Top 10: Favorite current lyrical rappers

Top 10: Favorite current lyrical rappers

So much of hip hop today has become too repetitive and gimmicky. Sometimes I feel like The Notorious B.I.G is rolling around his big ol’ casket when certain rappers come on. Look, I’ll be the first one to yell “2 Chainz”! at the top of my lungs and all that but when the likes of Young Thug and Rich Homie Kwan come on the radio I wish we could hear more meaningful or at least more insightful lyrics. Nothing against DJ Mustard and his repetitive clap tracks which has taken over rap in the past year, but a thinker like me longs for deeper meanings in music. Plenty of people can rap about a lavish lifestyle and drugs and women but to really tell a story is rare and special now a days.

Jay Electronica- Born Timothy Elpadaro Thedford in New Orleans now Electronica resides in London and has cemented his name in hip hop as one of the most conscious and reflective rappers. Electronica is the only artist on my list that has yet to release a studio album but is apparently working on releasing the second installment of his supposed trilogy set to be called “Act II: Patents of Nobility” which will succeed the “Act I: Eternal Sunshine” single from 2008. In 2014 Electronica released the song “Better in Tune with the Infinite” which opens with an excerpt from Professor Marvels monologue in the 1939 film “The Wizard of Oz”. Notable lyrics in that song are “my feet might fail me, my heart might ill me, the synagogues and satan might acuse me or jail me, they might defeat the flesh but they could never ever kill me.”

Tech N9ne- Tech N9ne has a loyal following of underground rap fans but has managed to win over even the most traditional rap fans. He has managed to walk the line between underground rapper and mainstream artist which generate hits. In 2013 N9ne released his thirteenth studio album titled “Something Else” and was broken up into three segments of Earth, Water and Fire. The album was supported by two singles “So Dope” and “Fragile” which received considerable air time. In the spring of 2014 he started his “Independent Grind” tour. N9ne has established himself and his label Strange Music into one of the most lucrative labels in hip hop.

A$AP Rocky- Rakim Mayers was born in Harlem, New York in the late 80’s, a critical point in hip hop history. Rocky broke out into the scene in 2011 with the help of his popular party singles “Purple Swag” and “Peso”. In 2013 Rocky released his first album “Long. Live. A$AP”. Rocky made headlines for multiple reasons while in a relationship with rapper Iggy Azalea. The couple’s breakup was publicized and the two went their separate ways musically and romantically. Rocky is set to be finishing up his second album which is set to release in the beginning of 2015.

Childish Gambino- Donald Glover has earned substantial credibility under his stage name within the hip hop community. Glover appeared on the NBC show Community for several seasons as Troy Barnes and in 2013 he departed from the show to focus on his music. Glover released his second album titled “Because of the internet” almost a year ago and it received positive reviews from publications such as Complex which called it the most ambitious album of 2013. Singles from that album include “3005” and “Telegraph Ave”. Lately Glover has been working with Ariana Grande and Jhene Aiko. In the song “Bed Peace” Gambino’s verse expresses his desire to make a relationship work. “curled up with my head on your chest, is the best remedy for the pain and the stress, if the world doesn’t change then we’ll never get dressed.”

Big K.R.I.T- K.R.I.T like many before him was baptized in the waters of southern rap. On Nov. 10, 2014 K.R.I.T released his second studio album titled “Cadillactica”. The album shows K.R.I.T lashing out at personal issues on songs like “Mt. Olympus” and also tones it down and shows appreciation on a song called “Life” where he has a line that says “I found life on this planet, dammit, I’ve been damaged, but I won’t take this for granted”. K.R.I.T caught the attention of fans back in 2010 with his mixtape “K.R.I.T Wuz Here” and then his second mixtape “Return of 4Eva” in 2011 which was entirely produced by the Mississippi rapper himself.

Ab-Soul- Soul walks the tight rope between ridiculous and sublime like much of his Black Hippy crew members but in 2014 the west coast rapper explored his versatility and released his third album called “These Days” and it features label mates Schoolboy Q, Action Bronson and Jay Rock. The album may be a bit overwhelming for some listeners as songs can quickly transcend from showcasing a maverick spirit to a very machismo sound and feel. Soul has always had a knack for bringing different talents together and that’s exactly what he did on his latest album. Look for Soul and other Top Dog Entertainment artists to keep making moves to the top.

Kanye West- Well, much has been said about West, like him or not he knows exactly what he’s doing when it comes to music. Yeezy has remained relevant in hip hop and in pop culture because of his words. In 2004 people were still getting used to the sound and the conscientious lyrics delivered in the College Dropout album. In the song “New Slaves” West makes his title seem a little more literal and goes at the corrections corporation of America for locking up minorities because of racial disparities. “Meanwhile the DEA teamed up with the CCA, they’re trying to lock ni***s up, they try to make new slaves, that’s that private owned prisons get your piece today, they’re probably all in the Hamptons braggin’ about what they made.”

Drake- Since his touchdown in 2009 Drake has always expressed sensitivity and emotion other rappers would be hesitant to express. The Young Money artist has always embraced the tension that comes with going back and forth between singing and rapping but has managed to do it almost flawlessly. Recently Drake was touring with his boss, Lil Wayne, on the “Drake vs. Lil Wayne tour”. Drake got his first taste of fame as a kid when he was on the show “Degrassi” for several seasons. Drake’s intellect and confidence have been evident on all of his tracks since day one. Drake has mastered the use of hashtag flows and double entendres but that’s not it, he’s worked hard for years to improve his vocals and his singing and that’s something he continues to improve.

J. Cole- In 2009 and 2010 Cole gained mad fan support after his two successful mixtapes “The Warm Up” in 09 and “Friday Night Lights” in ’10. Cole is the type of rapper you want to listen to regardless of what he’s rapping about. His lyrics and storytelling ability form pictures in my mind and really make Cole that much more relatable. He has the ability to put listeners in a dreamlike state while listening to the proper song. Earlier this year his record label, Dreamville Records, signed a distribution deal with Interscope records. On Dec. 9 Cole will release his third studio album called “2014 Forest Hills Drive”.

Kendrick Lamar- King Kendrick, K-Dot, call him what you want but Lamar is the present and the future of hip hop. Lyrically there is no one out like Lamar right now. Lamar is a Compton native and began rapping at an early age and at the age of 16 recorded his first mixtape. Multiple mixtapes would follow and allow Lamar to become a house hold name. His first studio album titled “Good kid m.A.A.d city” is a narrative driven story of a well-intentioned young guy who constantly feels the pressure of his environment. Songs such as “The Art of Peer Pressure” and “m.A.A.d city” depict the constant struggle of living in Compton and avoiding the gangster lifestyle. Lamar’s next album was set for release in Dec. of 2014 or in early 2015. Currently Lamar can be heard on the radio with his newest single simply titled “I” and featured on Jay Rock’s song “Pay for It.”

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Listen up, go see 'Philip'

Listen up, go see ‘Philip’

By ZACK LEDESMA

In director Alex Perry’s “Listen Up Philip,” Jason Shwartzman plays arrogant egocentric writer Philip Friedman, who lives in the city with his girlfriend Ashley, played by Elisabeth Moss.

Struggling to make headway on his newest novel, Friedman is offered to stay at the rural summer home of a once-famed writer named Ike Zimmerman, played by Jonathan Pryce, and his daughter Melanie played by Krysten Ritter.

This movie really excels at it is getting the viewers to despise the protagonist, which is everything but unintentional.

Shwartzman’s character has little regard for others emotions as he is afraid of people seeing him as anything other than a great literary entity.

Pryce’s character tries to channel his former glory through Philip, but constantly belittles him and justifies destructive characteristics by making him believe that if you are great you are entitled to be a vulgarian.

The comedy is supposed to come from how insufferable the characters are, which is not as funny as it is painfully realistic. This worked for and against the film.

Philip and Ike are so unlikable, but instead of being over the top and goofy as it may have been intended, it comes off as really believable and upsetting.

The film, a dramatic dark comedy featuring Shwartzman as a writer in the city, draws some parallels, including its main actor, with the HBO series “Bored to Death.”

The movie occasionally side steps to the stories of Ashley and Melanie who are affected the most by the selfishness of both men.

This gave me someone to root for, hoping that they both are eventually able to distance themselves from their poisonous relationships, which was ironically what Philip initially set out to do for himself.

Genuinely ingenious, Perry made a film where the focus of the picture is two static megalomaniacs that really exist to develop the more dynamic side characters.

Despite the main characters being detestable beyond belief, I still recommend seeing this movie. In the end, it was satisfying to get through all the pretentious babble for the last few scenes.

“Listen Up Philip” is opening theatrically at The Loft on Friday Nov 21. For times and ticket information, go to loftcinema.com.

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Top 10: Late-night Tucson restaurants

Top 10: Late-night Tucson restaurants

By ADRIANNA BARRIENTEZ

Many people think Tucson doesn’t have any restaurants open past 9 p.m., but it does. Here are my picks for the best choices:

10. HUB Restaurant & Ice Creamery

You can order a decent-sized sit-down meal or opt for take-out ice cream. The food and drinks are pricy but worth it. Closing time: midnight. Location: 266 E. Congress St.

9. In-N-Out Burger

The chain is cheap and has options ranging from triple patties to healthy protein burgers. Closing times: Sundays-Thursdays at 1 a.m., Fridays-Saturdays at 1:30 a.m. Locations: All around town, including two on East Broadway Blvd. and two on North Oracle Road.

8. Applebee’s

Applebee’s has great happy hours and healthy dishes. If you go with a friend, try the 2-for-$20 deal. Closing times: Mondays-Wednesdays at 1 a.m., Thursdays-Saturdays at 2 a.m. Locations: All around town, including West Ina Road and East Grant Road.

7. BK Tacos

The taco stand is a great place to take friends or family. Closing times: Sundays-Thursdays at 11 p.m., Fridays-Saturdays at midnight. Location: 2680 N. First Ave.

6. US Fries

The franchise offers crazy-different fries topped with almost anything you can imagine. Closing times: Mondays-Wednesdays at 10 p.m., Thursdays-Saturdays at 3 a.m. Location: 340 N. Fourth Ave.

5.  BJ’s Restaurant and Brewhouse

You can order appetizers, salads, pizza or burgers, and watch sports while you’re at it. Large groups welcome. Closing times: Mondays-Thursdays and Sunday at midnight, Fridays-Saturdays at 1 a.m. Locations: 4270 N. Oracle Road and 5510 E. Broadway Blvd.

4. IHOP

The chain is known for breakfast platters any time of day, but serves much more. It’s open 24 hours a day. Locations: All around town, including 1500 W. Grant Road, 7945 E. Broadway Blvd. and 4187 N. Oracle Road.

3. Cheba Hut

This marijuana-themed hippie-stoner chain serves a variety of toasted subs. Closing time: 2 a.m. Location: 1820 E. Sixth St.

2. Brooklyn Pizza Company

Brooklyn serves pizzas by the slice or whole. It’s pricey, but portions are huge. Closing time: Daily at 11 p.m. Late-night slices available Thursdays-Saturdays until 2:30 a.m. Location: 534 N. Fourth Ave.

1. Wings Over Broadway

You can watch live games while chowing down on wings or appetizers. Closing times: Mondays at 9 p.m., Tuesdays-Saturdays at 10 p.m. Location: 5004 E. Broadway Blvd.

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Horoscope

Horoscope

By TANISHA KNUTZEN

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Do you smell that, Scorpio? That’s the smell of old age and a freshly baked birthday cake. Eat the whole cake – you need to bury your “getting old” sorrows somehow.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

If you play your cards right, my little Sagittarius friend, you might find that king or queen you’ve been looking for. Let’s just hope you hit the jackpot with this one.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

You must learn to indulge a little, Capricorn, so don’t worry about all the looks you receive when your credit card is declined. That shopping spree was totally worth it.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

We get it, Aquarius, you want to save the world. You’re not a superhero though. Why not enjoy a relaxing movie and fresh popcorn for once? The world will still need saving when the movie is over.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)

Wash your hair, put on your best outfit and take yourself on a date. You deserve to be wined and dined, Pisces, even if you’re the one holding open doors and paying the tab.

Aries (March 21-April 19)

You’ve been so busy lately with school and work, Aries. It’s time to put the books away and sleep all day. You need some beauty rest.

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

We can tell you stuffed your face with all that half-priced Halloween candy, Taurus. I know it was delicious but the gym is calling your name now.

Gemini (May 21-June 21)

Stop worrying so much about what other people say, Gemini. They probably aren’t as well-spoken as you. Besides, you just don’t have time for that nonsense.

Cancer (June 22-July 22)

We all know you’re lying when you say, “just one more episode.” Learn to be honest with yourself and the people around you, Cancer. It’s never just one more episode.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)

You’ve always been the loudest and most energetic, Leo, but your friends are tired and their ears are starting to hurt. Stay home for once. You don’t want your friends to go deaf, now do you?

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

Stop spending so much time planning your Pinterest wedding and go out on a real date, Virgo. It can’t be an ideal wedding if only your cats are in attendance.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Oh Libra, I’d tell you to stop and smell the flowers but I know how much you hate them. Instead, I’m going to tell you to stop and taste the beers. Maybe after a few, you’ll learn to love those damn flowers.

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Pow! Boom! Tucson Comic-Con draws super crowd

Pow! Boom! Tucson Comic-Con draws super crowd

Pg11-ComicCon woman

A cosplayer dressed as Marvel’s Black Cat draws attendees in for photos. (Larry Gaurano/Aztec Press)

Pg11-Artist booth

Phoenix graphic artist Chad Stafford sells a variety of items in artist alley at the Tucson Comic-Con. (Larry Gaurano/Aztec Press)

 

 

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Tucson museum displays masterworks

Tucson museum displays masterworks

By ZACK LEDESMA

When we imagine the work of great artists, we picture their most renowned pieces. Most of us don’t think about the journey artists take to reach their peak of artistic vision and skill.

The Tucson Museum of Art aims to spark new thoughts about the early work of famous virtuosos in a new exhibit, “The Figure Examined.”

“The more you become exposed to an artist’s work, the more you understand how involved they get in what they create,” chief curator Julie Sasse said. “It’s not just that they came up with a style and stuck with it. They evolved.”

Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Jackson Pollock, Diego Rivera, Auguste Rodin and Andy Warhol are just a few of the artists who will leave museum visitors star struck. The exhibit will be on display through Feb. 22, 2015.

“In terms of the existing greats, this has been the pinnacle of my experience with working with modern art,” Sasse said. “It’s almost flabbergasting, the scope of art.”

She expects the exhibit to bring in audiences ranging from wide-eyed museum newcomers to art aficionados.

No matter the audience, Sasse hopes they come away with an understanding of the artists’ realizations and growth.

“It gives you a chance to realize that maybe the five quintessential pieces you know of from art history books aren’t the only things these artists have done,” Sasse said.

All of the exhibit artwork is courtesy of the Kasser Mochary Foundation, founded by Alexander and Elisabeth Kasser with their children Mary Mochary and Michael Kasser.

The collection was brought to Tucson through the collaboration of Sasse, foundation curator Joanne Stuhr and foundation deputy director Angela Novacek.

“My parents collected in order to feel closer to some of the most imaginative souls on our planet,” Mochary said in the exhibit catalog.

The collection accentuates 19th and 20th century European sculptures and paintings but also highlights defining and pivotal periods in the artists’ evolution.

Tucson Museum of Art admission costs $10 general, $8 for seniors and $5 for college students with ID. Youth ages 18 and under get in free, as do active military and veterans. Memberships are available for purchase.

“It brings me joy to think that people will care enough to want to see this,” Sasse said. “It means art is still alive and well.”

For more information, visit tucsonmuseumofart.org.

Pg11-Rodin-Tucson Museum of Art exhibit

Auguste Rodin, “Adam,” 1881; cast 1970, bronze, 8/12, Kasser Mochary Art Foundation.

Pg11-Toulouse-Lautrec

Henri de Toulouse–Lautrec, “La Loge au mascaron doré / Love with a Gilded Mascaron,” 1893, lithograph on paper.

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Horoscope

Horoscope

BY BETO HOYOS

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
You’re in need of some spiritual and celestial healing. Don’t let the pressures of society mask the real person. When your being is tired, exercise your soul.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
The best things that can happen to you will happen if you lower your expectations. Sometimes you just need to be realistic. Still, you’re an awesome person.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Don’t let the expectations you’ve set for yourself fall and crumple like the leaves in autumn. Just chill out and take a breather now and then. Besides, cooler weather should help with your hot headedness.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
It’s important for you to play your position and know your role. If you have teams, then represent your team, but if you happen to be a free agent, represent yourself. No shame in that.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
You can’t search the depths of others without first searching the depths of yourself. Look up to the stars for guidance. It’s difficult to open the door to the future without the proper cosmic key.

Aries (March 21-April 19)
College life is kind of like a cross-country meet. Everybody runs the same course, everyone goes through similar obstacles and similar pain, but we’re all running to a finish line. Some just finish faster than others.

Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Find the whimsical nature that was once synonymous with you, but don’t go all Willy Wonka on us. Simply try to find enjoyment in everyday situations. Don’t be so grumpy all the time!

Gemini (May 21-June 21)
If you don’t believe in yourself, nobody else ever will. Be the hero you want others to see you as. It’s not science fiction, it’s science faction.

Cancer (June 22-July 22)
Don’t go chasing waterfalls. It leads to nothing but wetness and ruined clothes. Dreams on the other hand, those you should chase. Always remember: Don’t follow your dreams, chase them!

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
You’re the captain of your own voyage. Your faith will return just as surely as the sun will rise. It seems like a long shot, I know, but it’ll work out.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
If you feel that nobody in the world understands you, then maybe it’s time to change your world. We can’t change our world unless we change ourselves.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
A wise man once said that everything happens for a reason. Take solace in these words. As the seasons transition into sweater weather, be a warm heart for those lost in the cold.

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Retreat to Tucson Botanical Gardens

Retreat to Tucson Botanical Gardens

By TAYLOR JONES

Tucson Botanical Gardens offers a refreshing chance to escape studying, homework and the stress of being a student.

The gardens’ mission promotes appropriate use of plants and water in a desert environment through education and demonstration.

Its shaded pathways radiate a strong sense of community, with benches dedicated to family members and loved ones.

One top attraction is the Cox Butterfly and Orchid Pavilion, which is open October through May. After weekly shipments of pupae emerge in a chrysalis exhibit, they are transferred to a greenhouse filled with hundreds of butterflies.

The facility also displays seasonal plants that attract migratory butterfly species, and showcases many different types of gardens.

I learned a lot from the herb garden, and from the displays of medicinal and culinary plants.

Visitors can view many aloe species during a walk along Aloe Alley, while the Prehistoric Garden’s petrified wood and living fossil plants give a feel for what Tucson looked like millions of years ago.

A Children’s Discovery Garden entertains youngsters with sculptures of pollinators and life-size bees and butterflies.

Children are also infatuated with the Gardens Gift Shop. The shop sells garden-inspired items ranging from tools to perfume to toys. Among the unique items offered for sale are small plant groupings called horticultural therapy beds that are raised and maintained by people with disabilities.

I could also smell a delicious lunch coming from the newly renovated dining area. The Café Botanica is open daily from 8 a.m-2 p.m.

Tucson Botanical Gardens strives to be recognized as the best small public garden in America. In my opinion, they are well on their way to exceeding that goal.

Pg13-Botanical Gardens

A shaded herb garden offers respite at the Tucson Botanical Gardens. The facility is also home to a popular butterfly and orchid pavilion. and a newly renovated cafe. (Taylor Jones/Aztec Press)

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BEST BETS: Bust out holiday costumes

BEST BETS: Bust out holiday costumes

Compiled by Alex Fruechtenicht

Early November has so much to offer in Tucson, from unleashing your inner geek to honoring ancestors from many different cultures. Get out of your comfort zone and go get cultured.

TusCon: Oct. 31- Nov. 2

Looking for a small convention with a big emphasis on sci-fi? Look no further than TusCon, headquartered at 475 N. Granada Ave.

The con opens at noon on Halloween and stays open around the clock until Sunday evening. Activities include panels, special guests, LAN parties, a film festival, art show and an anime room pumping Japanese pop music.

Only 500 persons can attend, so buy tickets early. A full three-day ticket costs $55 for anyone above age 13. Admission costs $30 for those under 13.

Details: tusconscificon.com

Celtic Festival/ Scottish Highland Games

Oct. 31- Nov. 2

Head over to Rillito Raceway Park, 4502 N. First Ave., on Oct. 31 for a family night of trick or treating, with free admission until 6 p.m.

The next day, a Celtic festival and highland games get underway with contests, live music, Scottish and Irish dancing, whisky tasting and much more.

An adult ticket costs $20 for the weekend or $15 for a one-day pass. Senior or military tickets are $10, and youth tickets cost $5.

Festivities run from 9 a.m.-10 p.m. on Saturday, and from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on Sunday.

Details: tucsoncelticfestival.org

Floating Lantern Workshop and Ceremony

Nov. 1

If you want to honor your ancestors like the Japanese do, visit Yume Japanese Gardens of Tucson at 2130 N. Alvernon Way.

People in Japan celebrate Obon, a festival that honors ancestors by making floating lanterns and releasing them onto water. Yume will help Tucsonans make their own obon lanterns at a workshop that starts at 4 p.m. Participants will release their lantern into a large koi pond.

The workshop costs $3, along with gardens admission of $9 for adults and $5 for children ages 3 to 15. Students with ID get in for $6.

Reserve a spot by emailing or calling in advance at yume.gardens@gmail.com or 322-2928.

Details:

tucsonjapanesegardens.org

2nd Saturdays Downtown

Nov. 8

Family fun at 2nd Saturdays includes live music, dancers and loads of shopping opportunities, with street vendors and restaurants staying open later than normal. The fun begins at 5 p.m.

The Nov. 8 event will feature live music from The Jonestown Band and Greyhound Soul.

The public shows are free for music fans of all ages to enjoy.

The Fox Theater will be showcase Black Violin at 7:30 p.m. with genres ranging from classical to hip hop and bluegrass with tickets starting at $18.

Details:

2ndsaturdaysdowntown.com

Tucson Comic-Con: Nov. 8-9

Can’t make it outside the city for the San Diego or New York Comic-Con? No worries. Tucson Comic-Con has got you covered.

Doors at the Tucson Convention Center, 260 S. Church Ave., open on Saturday at 10 a.m. and stay open until 7 p.m. The convention continues on Sunday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

A day pass will run you $10, while a weekend pass costs $15. Tickets can be purchased at the door.

Details: tucsoncomic-con.com

All Souls Procession

Nov. 9

Día de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is a Mexican tradition honoring those who have passed on. Tucson adds its own unique style with the annual All Souls Procession.

The free procession will start about 4 p.m. at 400 N. Sixth Ave. The grand finale begins at Mercado San Agustin on West Congress after the procession arrives, usually between 8:30-9 p.m.

Performers include Flam Chen, Danza Azteca Calpulli Tonantzin, Odaiko Sonora and the Community Spirit Group.

Check the website for numerous activities leading up the main event, and to view the procession route.

Details: allsoulsprocession.org

Veterans Day Parade

Nov. 11

Tucson’s Veterans Day parade, held each year to thank all veterans, starts from 330 W. Franklin St. at 11 a.m. and follows a route through downtown.

Use the website map to stake out a spot for free viewing.

Details:

tucsonveteransdayparade.org

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Top 10: Reasons to love October-December

Top 10: Reasons to love October-December

By ALEX FRUECHTENICHT

October to December are my favorite months. This list shows why year’s end is the best part of the calendar:

10. Pumpkin spice

Before you argue that pumpkin spice is overused, let me say I agree. The oversaturation has almost driven me away, but I still love pumpkin spice-infused foods and drinks. Starbucks’ pumpkin spice latte remains my favorite drink from the coffee shop.

9. Shorter days

With the sun being out less and less as we get deeper into winter, the days seem to go much faster than in other parts of the year.

8. Eggnog

I always grab eggnog from the first time I see it in early October until well into December. There’s something about this thick winter drink that just calls me and many others for an afternoon cup.

7. Winter break

Having time off between semesters is just what all of us at Pima need after stressing over finals. Most people leave the city to visit family or go on vacation, but relaxing at home can be just as good.

6. The holidays

You can’t help but get excited by all the holidays in the last quarter of the year. We have Halloween, Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas, Kwanzaa and many others that lead up to New Year’s Eve.

5. Holiday releases

If you’ve read my articles this semester, you know I like video games. October-December always promises most of the year’s best games. Throwing a blanket over yourself as you play a new game on the couch with a cup of coffee? Heaven.

4. Cool clothes

We all love wearing winter clothes. You’ve got hoodies, beanies, gloves, scarves, jackets and long pants to keep you warm, and they look awesome. Don’t forget to break out that scarf you bought three years ago.

3. Mount Lemmon snow

We don’t get snow all that often here, and you know what? I’m OK with that. I’ve heard the horror stories from relatives in Indiana. Thankfully, Mount Lemmon gives everyone in Tucson enough snow to play in — without the consequences.

2. Cuddling

If you’ve got a significant other, you understand the trouble of cuddling during warm summers. It just doesn’t work. But cuddling in the winter? Almost unbeatable.

1. Cold weather

I was born and raised in Tucson. After spending more than 20 boiling summers here, I can say without a doubt that being cold is way better. It may not get as cold as other places around the world, but I’m happy with the bit we get. I just wish it would last longer.

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Submit to SandScript

Submit to SandScript

Pima Community College’s SandScript art and literary magazine is accepting student submissions for the 2015 edition.

The fall submission deadline is Dec. 12 at 5 p.m. A second submission period will be held in the spring, and the magazine will publish in May.

Submissions are limited to PCC students who enrolled in at least two credits while attending classes during the summer or fall, or who enroll for Spring 2015.

Students may submit a maximum of two works of fiction or nonfiction, five poems and/or five visual art works. They may submit multiple genres, but each genre requires a separate submission form.

All works must be previously unpublished, and hard copies will not be returned.

For detailed submission guidelines and forms, visit aztecpressonline.com/sandscript. For more information, email sandscript@pima.edu.

The 2014 SandScript won first place in the Southwest Division of the Community College Humanities Association for the third year in a row.

SandScript adviser Joshua Cochran and student staffers will attend the association’s conference and award ceremony Nov. 6-8 in Austin, Texas.

-By Katie Stewart

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VENTOLIN PRICE