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Fall in love with these September events

Compiled by Katelyn Roberts

With the anticipation of crisper air and lower temperatures, September offers a selection of cultural festivals and special events sure to please everyone from beer connoisseurs to theater buffs.

 

Arizona Underground Film Festival
Sept. 16-24

pg10-arizona-film-festival

Image courtesy of AZUFF

Arizona Underground Film Festival will screen international and local independent movies for its ninth straight year at The Screening Room, 127 E. Congress.

A pass for every movie is $45. Admission for an individual screening costs $8.

Founder and festival director David Pike says he’s particularly excited about a documentary on UFO abductee Travis Walton. After the documentary screens on Sept. 17 at 1 p.m., Walton will conduct a question-and-answer session and a book signing.

Details: Azundergroundfilmfest.com

 

Tucson Beer Cup
Sept. 17

Ten local breweries will compete for Best Flagship Beer at Hotel Congress, 311 E. Congress St. Competition begins at 6 p.m. among 1055, 1912, Barrio, Borderlands, Catalina, Dragoon, Iron Johns, Nimbus, Pueblo Vida and Sentinel Peak.

Participants must be age 21 and up. General admission tickets costing $25 provide tastes of every beer and tasty snacks. If you spring for $50 VIP tickets, you’ll get more beer and can enjoy an expanded VIP buffet.

Tickets are $15 for selfless and sober designated drivers.

Details: hotelcongress.com, 622-8848

 

Tucson Greek Festival
Sept. 22-25

The Tucson Greek Festival will celebrate its 40th anniversary with dance performances, live music, special guests and, heaps of Greek food and beverages for sale. The festival takes place at St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church, 1145 E. Fort Lowell Road.

Admission is $3. Admission and raffle tickets can be purchased online.

Details: tucsongreekfest.com, 888-0505

 

“Nogales”
Through Sept. 25

Playgoers have an opportunity to take a visual journey through border culture as Borderlands Theater hosts Richard Montoya’s “Nogales” at the Temple of Music and Art Cabaret Theatre, 330 S. Scott Ave.

Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays and at 2 p.m. on Sundays.

Weekday tickets cost $12 for general admission and $7 for students, while weekend tickets are $26 for general admission and $14 for students. Senior discounts are also available. Tickets can be purchased online or by calling the box office at 882-7406.

Details: borderlandstheater.org, 882-7406

 

Mount Lemmon Oktoberfest
Sept. 17-Oct. 9

Beginning on Sept. 17, and continuing every weekend through Oct. 9, Mount Lemmon Ski Valley will host “Tucson’s most authentic Oktoberfest.” Expect traditional German eats, live German music and, of course, German beer!

Admission is free, with food and beverages available for purchase. Ski lift rides will also be available.

Keep your pet at home unless it’s a service animal.

Details: skithelemmon.com

Punk band evolves but holds onto DIY ethic

Punk band evolves but holds onto DIY ethic

By TRAVIS BRAASCH

While many musicians and bands continue to create music in the same vein as when they first started, Ceremony has broken free from the constraints of hardcore punk and continues to evolve with each new release.

Ceremony started in Rohnert Park, California, in the early 2000s.

The group released its first EP, titled “Ruined,” in 2005. The EP showcased a faster style of hardcore music often labeled as power-violence.

Shortly after, Ceremony released its first full-length album, “Violence Violence,” through the hardcore label Deathwish Inc.

Band members have known each other as far back as middle school and many members have played together in bands since their teens.

Guitarist Anthony Anzaldo’s interest in playing music goes back to his childhood, when his father worked for MCA and Elektra records as a record promoter.

“His job was to get songs played on the radio,” Anzaldo said. “Before becoming a record promoter he worked as a radio DJ, so music has always been a major part of my family. I was exposed to various types of music since birth.”

pg13-ceremony-band-members

Photo courtesy of Ceremony

For many musicians, an artist or band sparks an interest in creating music themselves. For Anzaldo, Prince made a lasting impression.

“I discovered Prince when I was 8 years old and it opened up a whole new world of music for me as far as the way I would listen to and enjoy music,” Anzaldo said. “He was the one who first inspired me to play music myself.”

While Ceremony found success within the hardcore and punk community with a blend of fast tempos, noisy guitar blasts and rapid-fire lyric delivery, band members found themselves growing and evolving as musicians.

“With fast hardcore music like “Ruined” or “Violence Violence,” it’s only done well when you’re young,” Anzaldo said. “That youthful angst is what makes hardcore and punk music great.”

Ceremony released two records under the well-known punk label Bridge Nine that showed a change in style.

The album “Still Nothing Moves You” reflected interest in textures and layers of sound. “Rohnert Park” began to sneak in spoken word passages and vocalist Ross Farrar used a more traditional singing style.

“It was definitely a natural progression for us to move away from hardcore music,” Anzaldo said. “We all grow up, change and evolve, and our records reflect this. It’s worked out for the best.”

Fan Eli Hernandez said Ceremony’s lyrics are still punk.

“Punk lyrics are personal and are usually from the singer’s life experiences, and they still have that on their newer records,” Hernandez said.

“I never really notice what label a band is on first,” he added. “If a band is good, then I’ll listen to them.”

Ceremony’s progression in sound included signing with the larger Matador record label, which is known for having a roster of bands that play various styles of music rather than focusing on any specific genre.

The group’s move to a larger label garnered criticism from hardcore fans who embrace smaller labels and a DIY aesthetic. Anzaldo said jumping to labels like Bridge Nine and Matador can seem like a big jump, but it’s really not.

“Labels don’t really matter the same way they did in the ’70s and ’80s,” he said. “People don’t listen to a band or musicians just because of the label.”

After joining Matador Records, Ceremony released the album “Zoo” in 2012 and “The L-Shaped Man” last year.

The albums show a giant shift in the group’s style, embracing the sparse style known as post-punk that originated in the ’80s.

“We know a portion of our fan base is made up of hardcore kids who loved our first records but we know that “The L-Shaped Man” is not a hardcore album,” Anzaldo said.

“We make music for us and if you like it then that’s wonderful but we aren’t going to pander to our fan base to just go on tour,” he added.

While the group has scaled back its blast beats and edgy lyrics, “The L-Shaped Man” sounds like a record made by a band knowing exactly what it wants to do.

It calls up memories of a band like Joy Division and The Fall, which paved the way for post-punk music. The lyrics remain personal, however, and the album still sounds very much like a Ceremony record.

“I feel like the album is definitely post-punk but we have always played music that didn’t necessarily fall into one scene or another,” Anzaldo said.

“People who listen to Ceremony cannot be grouped into one niche or scene, and getting to tour with a band like Bloc Party has shown we can play in front of different audiences and people will dig our music,” he added.

Being in an active band for a decade has given band members time to grow as people and as musicians, and their latest album reflects this. Ceremony is functioning better than ever and has no plans of letting up.

“We used to tour a lot more,” Anzaldo said. “When we put out a record, we will do an American tour and a little European run but we actually aren’t on the road anymore.”

Ceremony finished its American tour with Touche Amore last month. The band always has plans to record new music, so fans should keep an ear to the ground for news of an upcoming release within the next year.

For more information, visit ceremonyhc.com or matadorrecords.com.

Bernal Gallery exhibit features artwork by 16 PCC instructors

Bernal Gallery exhibit features artwork by 16 PCC instructors

By ASHLEY MUNOZ

A Pima Community College faculty exhibit at the Louis Carlos Bernal Gallery spotlights the artwork of Greg Loumeau, Michael Nolan and Mano Sotelo.

 

Other featured arts instructors include Mariana Carreras, Joseph Dal Pra, Matthias Düwel, Patti Gardiner, Dennis Landry, Barbara Jo McLaughlin, Christina McNearney, Laura Milkins, Ann Simmons-Myers, Reinhard Pawlicki, Nancy Spaulding, Michael Stack and Hiro Tashima.

 

The exhibit opened Sept. 6 and will continue through Oct. 7. The Bernal Gallery, located in the West Campus Center for the Arts, is free and open to the public.

 

During an artist lecture at the gallery on Sept. 15 at 7 p.m., Loumeau will perform a self-written song with Uma deSilva while displaying a slide show of his artwork. Loumeau teaches digital arts classes at West Campus.

 

Nolan teaches visual arts at West Campus and Sotelo teaches visual arts at East Campus. Both artists created large, figurative oil paintings.

 

The 13 additional full-time art instructors featured in the exhibit employ a wide range of mediums and styles. They represent visual arts, digital arts, photography and fashion design departments at all six PCC campuses.

 

Gallery director David Andres called the exhibit “a wonderful opportunity” for students and community members to view professional work by Pima arts instructors.

 

“All of the arts faculty have exhibited at galleries and/or art museums either locally, nationally or internationally,” he said.

 

The Bernal Gallery is open Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Friday from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. and before most evening performances in the Center for the Arts theaters.

 

In addition to the Bernal exhibit, select works from the featured artists will be on display at the Tucson International Airport gallery through Oct. 14.

 

For additional exhibit information, call 206-6942 or visit pima.edu/cfa.

 

FYI

PCC Faculty Exhibit

When: Through Oct. 7

Where: Bernal Gallery, West Campus

Admission: Free

Details: 206-6942

 

Greg Loumeau "She's Too Good for Me" MIXED MEDIA 24" X 36"

Greg Loumeau – “She’s Too Good for Me” MIXED MEDIA 24″ X 36″

 

Michael Nolan - "And the Whisper Creeps the Silence" oil on linen 40" x 55"

Michael Nolan – “And the Whisper Creeps the Silence” oil on linen 40″ x 55″

 

Mano Sotelo "Resurrection Project, Savior 1," oil and panel 36" x 48"

Mano Sotelo – “Resurrection Project, Savior 1,” oil and panel 36″ x 48″

PRETTY TIED UP: A love, sex and relationships advice column … written for your pleasure

PRETTY TIED UP: A love, sex and relationships advice column … written for your pleasure

 

pretty_tied_up 

By S. PAUL BRYAN

 

Prior to your falling in love with this column and therefore reading every word insatiably, I’d like to let you know a bit about this column and about me, your trusty love, sex and relationship adviser.

 

This is an open column. No rules, no judgment and nothing off limits. The column, for the most part, will be written in a question and answer format. Think Dear Abby with more nudity and kink … you get the idea.

 

Do you need sexual advice? You got it. Do you want information on how to begin a relationship, or end one? I’m your guy. Falling in or out of love? Let me help you.

 

Medical concerns? I’ll most likely have your answer. If not, I’ll consult with medical professionals in order to share with you the best knowledge that I can.

 

So what kind of an adviser on all things romance would I be if I didn’t share my not-so-secret secrets with you?

 

I’m a full-time single dad. I’ve had four long-term relationships (three or more years) and countless short-term relationships.

 

When my classmates in kindergarten were looking for bugs, I was looking for a girlfriend. I started having sex when I was too young. No, definitely not the healthiest thing in the world but kinda makes me a perfect writer for this column, huh?

 

As junior high and high school came around, my peers were concerned with pleasing the coach or teammates on whichever sports team I was playing on. I was concerned with pleasing the cheerleaders, female teachers and my friends’ moms watching in the stands.

 

There will not be many topics or questions that I wouldn’t have some type of exposure to or have personally experienced.

 

Swinging and group sex? Water sports? Cross-dressing? Foot worship? Spanking?

Voyeurism and exhibitionism? Role-play? Domination and submission? Yes, please.

 

Bring on the questions or concerns. I’m ready.

 

I love women. I spent a large part of my childhood around my mom and sister, and I’m now raising three daughters (along with my son). I respect, admire and honor women.

 

Being raised in the southeastern United States, where tolerance wasn’t always a word people lived by, I did. I’m a supporter of the LBGTQ community. I encourage any questions from all walks of life.

 

With this column you’ll laugh, you’ll cry and quite possibly climax.

 

Don’t get your tingly bits in a knot (unless that’s what you’re into), we’re going to have fun.

 

OK for this column: Anything and everything, tame to profane. Delightful or painful. Medical or medically induced. Funny, sexy, raunchy or concerned, worried, in need of help.

 

NOT OK: Anything illegal.

 

Use a pseudonym when you submit your question(s), no real names.

 

Submit questions via email to aztecpress@pima.edu, as a private Facebook message via Facebook.com/Aztec Press, or via Twitter @aztecpressnews using #prettytiedupAP.

 

© Warner Bros.

TOP 10: Summer blockbusters of last decade

By MELINA CASILLAS

 

Another summer has come and gone, and so have some of the year’s biggest movies. Summer blockbusters are highly anticipated, bringing in big bucks and featuring even bigger actors and actresses.

 

One single year doesn’t have 10 top movies, so here are the best summer blockbusters of the past decade:

 

  1. TIE: “Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End” and “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” (2007)

These films not only had the highest box office numbers, but they’re cult favorites. They featured some of the biggest names in Hollywood, such as Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom, Emma Watson and Daniel Radcliffe.

 

  1. “The Dark Knight” (2008)

This movie is still one of the most talked about Batman films for generations of DC fans, due to Heath Ledger’s performance as the infamous villain Joker. The film won two Oscars, one for Ledger’s performance and the other for Best Sound Editing.

 

  1. “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” (2009)

The Harry Potter films just scream summer blockbuster. In yet another book-to-film adaptation from J.K. Rowling, this movie stands alone. Not only is it one of the best Potter films, but 2009 wasn’t much for hit movies.

 

  1. “Toy Story 3” (2010)

This film was not only the best of the summer, but the best of 2010. The tear-jerking third installment, 11 years in the making, piggybacked off the success of its 1995 and 1999 prequels. Now, fans patiently wait for the release of “Toy Story 4” in 2018.

 

  1. “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2” (2011)

No surprise for the fan-favorite Potter franchise, the eighth and final installment of the film adaptations was again the biggest movie of both the summer and the year.

 

  1. “The Avengers” (2012)

This film was the first to assemble some of the biggest superhero names in the Marvel universe, including Iron Man, Thor, Captain America and Hulk. The movie was action packed but family friendly. No wonder it grossed the most money of any movie in 2012.

 

  1. “Iron Man 3” (2013)

Robert Downey Jr. returned as wealthy superhero Iron Man for this summer blockbuster, which was topped only by the spring release of another Disney-made film, “Frozen.” Franchises love sequels, and “Iron Man 3” was another good sequel in another great movie franchise.

 

  1. “Guardians of the Galaxy” (2014)

Marvel topped the summer movies once more with this film, which included such famous names as Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana and Bradley Cooper. The movie also included a great throwback soundtrack that both older and newer generations loved. With the thought of fighting in space, it’s no wonder this movie was a hit.

 

  1. “Jurassic World” (2015)

Chris Pratt was a big name after coming from the TV show “Parks and Rec” and the aforementioned “Guardians of the Galaxy.” Combine a famous name, cooler dinosaurs and a park like no one’s ever seen before, and you’ll get a hit no matter when the film is released.

 

  1. “Suicide Squad” (2016)

With a rating of 26 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, why would this movie even make it to this list? Because it was the highest grossing movie of the summer, despite receiving hate from critics and some moviegoers. It also has a popular cast and a killer soundtrack. Some people, including myself, loved the movie.

 

© Warner Bros.

The cast from “Suicide Squad” (L-R) TOP ROW: Killer Croc, Rick Flag, Deadshot. BOTTOM ROW: Harley Quinn, Katana, Boomerang.

 

© Walt Disney/Pixar

TOY STORY 3
(L-R) Bullseye, Mr. Potato Head, Mrs. Potato Head, Jessie, Hamm, Barbie, Woody.

 

© Warner Bros

Albus Dumbledore “Harry Potter and The Order of the Phoenix.”

 


 

Horoscopes

Horoscopes

By DAVID PUJOL

 

Virgo (Aug. 23- Sept. 22)

I’d like to say thank you, Virgo. It might not be said as often as it should be but know we’re thankful for you! Don’t get discouraged if you aren’t praised for your kindness. If life gets too hard, become an artist.

 

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

It may seem as if no one is concerned with your feelings or opinions, Libra, but that is not the case. You are so helpful, and your voice matters even when no one asks. If it gets too hard, become a talk show host.

 

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Times may be hard, Scorpio, but it’s the beginning of a new school year so stay strong. I won’t pry but I hope you’re OK. People care for you. If you disagree, you can become a stripper.

 

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec 21)

It may seem as if there’s a lot of negativity present in the coming weeks. Just know, Sagittarius, that you need to be positive. If you disagree, become an accountant.

 

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan 19)

It can be very hard work, Capricorn, but you need to put in the effort. Don’t give up. If it gets too difficult, become a tattoo artist.

 

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

You love it, Aquarius, when someone acknowledges what is actually going on. Ignorance isn’t bliss and you should take pride in your voice. If you disagree, become a presidential candidate.

 

Pisces (Feb.19-March 20)

I know how horrible it feels when no one wants to listen to you. But Pisces, just tell us what is going on with you. If it gets too hard, become a struggling writer.

 

Aries (March 21-April 19)

It seems obvious that you want appreciation, Aries. Just know you are an awesome human being. If life gets too hard, become a firefighter.

 

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

It’s OK to step outside of your comfort zone, Taurus. You may feel exposed but you are brave for doing so. We care and you’ll have our support. If you disagree, become a chef.

 

Gemini (May 21-June 20)

You are always changing, Gemini. It’s only human nature to do so, but others may see you as two-faced or artificial. Please don’t listen to them. If you disagree, become a model.

 

Cancer (June 21- July 22)

You’re very insecure, Cancer, and may need reassurance that you are valued. It’s awful to feel unappreciated but just wait: Your loved ones will let you know they love you. If life gets too hard, become a teacher.

 

Leo (July 23- Aug. 22)

You are very charming, Leo, and often get away with things that would trip up most other people. However, you should reconsider some of your actions. If life gets too hard, become an actor.

 

Art Briefs

Art Briefs

 

Sept. 22 show explores immigrant journeys

 

East Campus will host a free one-woman show called “They Call Me Q” on Sept. 22 at 11:30 a.m. in the Community Room.

 

The play, written and performed by Qurrat Ann Kadwani, explores the experiences of a girl from Bombay growing up in the Bronx.

 

“They Call Me Q” symbolizes the journey of immigrants who seek balance between cultural pressure and wanting acceptance into American culture.

 

During the one-hour performance, Kadwani will perform as 13 different characters, portraying her parents, teachers, classmates and friends who shaped her life.

 

Kadwani has received many national and international awards.

 

In 2014, she became the first South Asian female to have a solo play produced off Broadway, where it ran for seven months. She was also featured on Fox 5 NY as a “Woman Who Shapes the Future.”

 

For more information, call 206-7616 or email ec-studentlife@pima.edu.

 

-By Francisco Zapata

 

Student Gallery exhibit spotlights Digital Arts

 

Work by Pima Community College Digital Arts students will be on display Sept. 19 to Oct. 14 in a Fall Visual Arts exhibition in the West Campus Student Gallery.

 

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

 

A gallery reception will be held Tuesday, Sept. 20, from noon to 2 p.m.

 

The Student Gallery is located on the second floor of the Santa Rita “A” building, near the administration offices.

 

Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.

 

For more information, call 206-6942.

 

-By Robyn Zelickson

Photo courtsey of Desmond Devenish

Tucson-made movie achieves wider distribution

By ROBYN ZELICKSON

A movie filmed in Tucson has moved on to screenings in locations ranging from South Dakota to Sweden.

Los Angeles filmmaker Desmond Devenish spent three weeks shooting his crime thriller “Misfortune” in Tucson. He premiered the movie at Tucson’s Arizona International Film Festival last May.

While in Tucson, Devenish began a “grassroots campaign” for a theatrical release of the film.

Discussions with Harkins Theaters proved fruitful and Tucson theater-goers were introduced to “Misfortune” from Aug. 26 to Sept. 1.

Devenish returned for the opening and was very pleased with the response from Tucsonans.

In other showings, “Misfortune” won Best Feature Film 2016 at the Black Hills Film Festival in Rapid City, South Dakota.

Coincidently, Rapid City is the former home of “Misfortune” producer Roger Steilen. Devenish called Steilen an instrumental part of the production, someone he could depend on for everything from locations to catering to crew.

Steilen’s confidence and calm presence provided a steadying influence when troubleshooting and problem-solving were needed, Devenish said.

“Misfortune” also screened at the Dances with Films Festival at the famous Chinese Theatre in Los Angeles, and was scheduled to show at the Toronto International Film Festival Sept. 8-18.

A European screening took place on Sept. 3 in Örebro, Sweden.

Devenish has reached an independent film distribution contract with ITN Distribution Inc., which acquires and distributes films worldwide for TV, VOD, DVD and theatrical markets.

Digital distribution will enable Devenish to step back from distribution and marketing and concentrate on his next project.

That film will be based on a book by Stacey Cochran called “Eddie and Sunny.” It’s the story of two characters living in their car with their young son in rural North Carolina.

When crime strikes, they go on the run. The two become separated and have to find each other again.

“Eddie and Sunny is the story of a family finding its soul, but to do so they have to lose one another first,” according to amazon.com.It is a story of hope, love and the American Dream.”

Devenish also feels he has more work yet to do in Tucson. He received strong support from Independent Film Arizona, which he says is a “strong-knit community creating more work, camaraderie and a referral system for filmmakers.”

It’s a collaboration that strongly appeals to Devenish and his belief in the importance of working together to create a more positive experience in the world of film and in the world at large.


 Actor-director creates vision for collaboration

By ROBYN ZELICKSON

 

Desmond Devenish can clearly see the bigger picture. He calls it Gunnison Galaxy.

Devenish is building a starting point for up-and-coming filmmakers so they can take advantage of a broad base of established contacts in the film industry. He knows the struggle of trying to break in and wants to help new artists side-step that struggle.

In terms of his own filmmaking experience, his first effort was a disappointment. He lost his investment of time, money and effort due to the betrayal of a partner. Financial and emotional recovery was not easy.

Finally, he was able to move forward with his film “Misfortune,” whose themes of betrayal, loss and greed proved to be cathartic.

“Sometimes you find yourself in a situation which has gotten the better of you,” he said. “You look for answers and logic and perhaps the situation is the answer. If you can come out of it learning from it and strengthening your intuition and learning to trust that, it will save you the pain.”

Devenish had struggles with “Misfortune” too. However, after all the effort of the past, he wanted to finish the project in a strong fashion. Reaching out to sound engineer Tony Lamberti, he was able to create the powerful effect needed to allow the film to tell its story.

Ultimately, Devenish wanted the audience to feel that no matter how far down someone has been pushed, no matter how much they have lost, they have to keep moving forward. As long as they have a feeling of self-possession, completion, sense of self or love, moving forward is possible.

“That is the story in all of us. That is where all the growth is,” Devenish said.

Many films have inspired Devenish’s creativity, but one in particular stands out – “Platoon” by Oliver Stone because of the myriad of angles of the storytelling.

Not all wars are the same but there is always conflict. The beauty is in showing the situation with unbiased perspective from many points of view, Devenish believes.

“As a filmmaker, you don’t have to say just one thing,” he said. “You can let the audience decide, without being ambiguous. Let them take away what they want.”

What he wants to accomplish is honesty and truth, presenting the most crystalline point of view without manipulating the audience. The most important thing, he believes, is to be true to yourself, honest with yourself and to take your responsibility as a storyteller seriously.

Devenish encourages aspiring film-makers to get the most affordable camera they can, find something to record sound and get two or three friends who will work free or cheap and just start filming. Put in the time. Learn by trial and error. Use the internet, YouTube, Vimeo.

“If you have an idea, you can shoot anything,” he said.

It’s an amazing time to see the potential in all of us, Devenish believes. We need to create alliances between artists of all sorts to effectively give people what they need.

“Gunnison Galaxy is fostering the right idealogy,” he said. “It’s supportive and positive, so that we can work to get the best out of each other. We can be more cohesive and that positive energy will make the world better.”

For more information on Gunnison Galaxy, visit gunnisongalaxy.com.

Photo courtsey of Desmond Devenish

Director Desmond Devenish

 


 

Photo courtsey of Desmond Devenish

Tucson-made film achieves wider distribution

By ROBYN ZELICKSON

 A movie filmed in Tucson has moved on to screenings in locations ranging from South Dakota to Sweden.

Los Angeles filmmaker Desmond Devenish spent three weeks shooting his crime thriller “Misfortune” in Tucson. He premiered the movie at Tucson’s Arizona International Film Festival last May.

While in Tucson, Devenish began a “grassroots campaign” for a theatrical release of the film.

Discussions with Harkins Theaters proved fruitful and Tucson theater-goers were introduced to “Misfortune” from Aug. 26 to Sept. 1.
Devenish returned for the opening and was very pleased with the response from Tucsonans.

In other showings, “Misfortune” won Best Feature Film 2016 at the Black Hills Film Festival in Rapid City, South Dakota.

Coincidently, Rapid City is the former home of “Misfortune” producer Roger Steilen. Devenish called Steilen an instrumental part of the production, someone he could depend on for everything from locations to catering to crew.

Steilen’s confidence and calm presence provided a steadying influence when troubleshooting and problem-solving were needed, Devenish said.

“Misfortune” also screened at the Dances with Films Festival at the famous Chinese Theatre in Los Angeles, and was scheduled to show at the Toronto International Film Festival Sept. 8-18.

A European screening took place on Sept. 3 in Örebro, Sweden.

Devenish has reached an independent film distribution contract with ITN Distribution Inc., which acquires and distributes films worldwide for TV, VOD, DVD and theatrical markets.

Digital distribution will enable Devenish to step back from distribution and marketing and concentrate on his next project.

That film will be based on a book by Stacey Cochran called “Eddie and Sunny.” It’s the story of two characters living in their car with their young son in rural North Carolina.

Director Desmond Devenish

Director Desmond Devenish

When crime strikes, they go on the run. The two become separated and have to find each other again.

“Eddie and Sunny is the story of a family finding its soul, but to do so they have to lose one another firs
t,” according to amazon.com.It is a story of hope, love and the American Dream.”

Devenish also feels he has more work yet to do in Tucson. He received strong support from Independent Film Arizona, which he says is a “strong-knit community creating more work, camaraderie and a referral system for filmmakers.”

It’s a collaboration that strongly appeals to Devenish and his belief in the importance of working together to create a more positive experience in the world of film and in the world at large.


 

Actor-director creates vision for collaboration

By ROBYN ZELICKSON

Desmond Devenish can clearly see the bigger picture. He calls it Gunnison Galaxy.

Devenish is building a starting point for up-and-coming filmmakers so they can take advantage of a broad base of established contacts in the film industry. He knows the struggle of trying to break in and wants to help new art
ists side-step that struggle.

In terms of his own filmmaking experience, his first effort was a disappointment. He lost his investment of time, money and effort due to the betrayal of a partner. Financial and emotional recovery was not easy.

Finally, he was able to move forward with his film “Misfortune,” whose themes of betrayal, loss and greed proved to be cathartic.

“Sometimes you find yourself in a situation which has gotten the better of you,” he said. “You look for answers and logic and perhaps the situation is the answer. If you can come out of it learning from it and strengthening your intuition and learning to trust that, it will save you the pain.”

Devenish had struggles with “Misfortune” too. However, after all the effort of the past, he wanted to finish the project in a strong fashion. Reaching out to sound engineer Tony Lamberti, he was able to create the powerful effect needed to allow the film to tell its story.

Ultimately, Devenish wanted the audience to feel that no matter how far down someone has been pushed, no matter how much they have lost, they have to keep moving forward. As long as they have a feeling of self-possession, completion, sense of self or love, moving forward is possible.

“That is the story in all of us. That is where all the growth is,” Devenish said.

Many films have inspired Devenish’s creativity, but one in particular stands out – “Platoon” by Oliver Stone because of the myriad of angles of the storytelling.

Not all wars are the same but there is always conflict. The beauty is in showing the situation with unbiased perspective from many points of view, Devenish believes.

“As a filmmaker, you don’t have to say just one thing,” he said. “You can let the audience decide, without being ambiguous. Let them take away what they want.”

What he wants to accomplish is honesty and truth, presenting the most crystalline point of view without manipulating the audience. The most important thing, he believes, is to be true to yourself, honest with yourself and to take your responsibility as a storyteller seriously.

Devenish encourages aspiring film-makers to get the most affordable camera they can, find something to record sound and get two or three friends who will work free or cheap and just start filming. Put in the time. Learn by trial and error. Use the internet, YouTube, Vimeo.

“If you have an idea, you can shoot anything,” he said.

It’s an amazing time to see the potential in all of us, Devenish believes. We need to create alliances between artists of all sorts to effectively give people what they need.

“Gunnison Galaxy is fostering the right idealogy,” he said. “It’s supportive and positive, so that we can work to get the best out of each other. We can be more cohesive and that positive energy will make the world better.”

For more information on Gunnison Galaxy, visit gunnisongalaxy.com.

Film festival brings international flair

Film festival brings international flair

By ROBYN ZELICKSON

The world arrived in Tucson last month, courtesy of the Arizona International Film Festival.

AIFF took place from April 14 to May 1 at The Screening Room, located downtown at 127 E. Congress St.

Over the course of the festival’s 25 years, 95 countries have submitted films.

“We received over 800 submissions and accepted over 100 from 25 countries this year alone,” said Mia Schnaible, AIFF director of marketing and development.

The films covered categories from action to science fiction in a multitude of themes.

Los Angeles filmmaker Desmond Devenish was represented with his entry, “Misfortune.” Devenish spent three weeks shooting the crime thriller in Tucson.

Co-star and co-writer Xander Bailey worked in Tucson on the 2010 short film, “My Father’s Son.” He loved the location and convinced Devenish to shoot their new film in the city.

AIFF was the best fit for the film’s U.S. premiere, Devenish said. “Misfortune” screened to a packed house of enthusiastic and absorbed listeners on April 29.

Devenish had considered bigger festivals such as Tribeca and Sundance. “The nice thing about coming here is I shot this locally, and I have so much respect and support for this community,” he said.

The film’s world premiere screening took place in India in January.

“People don’t know what to make of it but I wanted to do it because I thought, ‘What a great experience,’” Devenish said. “To go to a country east of Europe, that’s now coming to gain even more appreciation for traditional cinema, as well as stronger financing options for overseas films.”

“Misfortune” was a collaboration of talent, with locals playing extras and working on the crew. Sound re-recording and mixing came from Tony Lamberti, who has worked on movies such as “Django Unchained” and “Inglourious Basterds” for Quentin Tarantino.

Devenish believes talent is very important, along with creativity, original ideas and passion. He has learned, however, that persistence trumps all.

His thesis project, “Split,” gained distribution at Cannes because of persistence. All meetings with distributors were booked, so Devenish crashed a breakfast meeting.

Two months later, he received an email asking if “Split” was still available. He was given a distribution deal with Shorts International, a rarity for a short film.

“Misfortune” will continue on the festival circuit.

“We have a couple more spots with this film,” Devenish said. “We’re playing Black Hills, South Dakota, and then we have an LA screening. Our goal of the circuit is to come back to Tucson and get a nice theatrical here.”

Devenish plans to generate more visibility for films in Tucson and Arizona. The state does not offer tax incentives, but he believes the legislature will be more inclined to institute inducements for filmmakers if more films are made here.

Up next for Devenish is work as an associate producer on a documentary called “Gregory Porter, Don’t Forget Your Music.” It spotlights a Grammy-winning jazz vocalist from Bakersfield who moved to New York, performed in Harlem and made a name for himself.

“He’s extremely popular in Germany and other countries in Europe but does not have any significant visibility in the U.S.,” Devenish said. “There’s a lot of talent that is present and it’s just about finding an outlet.”

Finding an outlet is also the goal of another of Devenish’s  projects—a collective called Gunnison Galaxy.

“My goal is ultimately to create a place where we can have any independent artists that work together to have distribution and great avenues and be able to more easily pipeline projects from beginning to end,” he said.

“I think there needs to be much more synergy in this industry and I see how effectively it works in smaller pockets,” he added. “I know for a fact that it’s going to be very successful when we all start working together and finding our mutual goals and are able to find a way to make all of our projects come together.”

Devenish’s philosophy of successful filmmaking exceeds profits. He believes you need to get out of your mind, let go of fear, believe in the work and know that the goal is bigger than you.

“It’s not so much about people understanding your ideas or understanding your metaphors,” he said.

Rather, he believes people come to the movies to have an experience. “If you can provide that experience for them, then you have this mutual moment and that’s wonderful.”

Desmond Devenish awaits his “Misfortune” screening. Robyn Zelickson/Aztec Press

Desmond Devenish awaits his “Misfortune” screening.
Robyn Zelickson/Aztec Press

PCC film instructor: a student of legends

PCC film instructor: a student of legends

By ELLIE BAYLY

Scorsese. Stone. Coppola. Primack?

Bret Primack rolls with legends, Pima Community College students and anyone else he meets. He is a man guided by his passions for film and jazz, but storytelling as a videographer and journalist is his stock-in-trade.

“No matter what type of film or video it is, it’s always about a story,” Primack said. “I’m a storyteller.”

He learned at the feet of giants.

Primack has always been interested in movies, but had never considered it as a career until he attended a film conference where Francis Ford Coppola spoke.

“He had yet to direct his first film,” Primack said. “He wasn’t the famous filmmaker that he was yet, but there was something really magical about him.”

Coppola crystallized it for Primack. “That’s who I want to be,” Primack said. “That’s what I want to do.”

He wrote a letter to Coppola, and Coppola responded.

In 1968, Primack’s first year at New York University, Coppola was shooting a film nearby.

Primack contacted him and they had breakfast together.

“George Lucas was there. He was like his assistant,” Primack said. “So I got to hang out with them.”

Primack sensed chemistry between Coppola and himself, and seriously considered asking to be an intern or offering to volunteer on the project.

“If I had done that, my life would have gone in an entirely different direction,” Primack said. “If I could change one thing in my life, it would be that.”

But his parents wanted him to stay in school, which he did.

Primack recognizes the opportunity he had, but understands why it didn’t happen and how it put him on a path to film school.

“I was hanging out with Francis Coppola and George Lucas and Robert Duvall—my God,” Primack said. “But it just wasn’t meant to be at that time.”

Primack entered NYU’s film school shortly after, where he was taught by Martin Scorsese and became a classmate of Oliver Stone.

From Scorsese, Primack learned a love of cinema, directors and film analysis. Primack saw Scorsese’s dedication to film and his willingness to share details with his students.

“It was an opportunity to study someone who was not only an expert but very enthusiastic and very giving in terms of what he wanted to share with his students,” he said. “You couldn’t help but want to go along with him on the journey because he made everything so cool.”

Primack came to appreciate the work of directors studied in Scorsese’s classes, including Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock and John Ford.

“When you study with someone like that … suddenly the world of possibilities opens up,” Primack said.

However, another passion remained constant in Primack’s life.

Before the film bug bit him, Primack cherished jazz.

He played the trumpet as a youth and his father was a musician.

Famed jazz musician Louis Armstrong’s appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show” galvanized Primack, and he was a die-hard fan.

“He was just so joyful,” Primack said. “I just wanted to climb into the screen and join him.”

In 2006, Primack eventually combined his jazz passion with his love of film in the “Jazz Video Guy,” sharing the stories of jazz musicians via video.

Primack arrived in Tucson earlier in the summer of 2001.

“I had been visiting friends out here for a couple of winters and it seemed like a good place,” he said. “So one day I packed up life and drove here.”

Today, Primack has moved toward teaching, sharing his knowledge with those who want to learn.

Recommended as an instructor to PCC by a friend and faculty colleague, he prepares PCC students in Documentary Filmmaking, Digital Video Production and Video Editing.

“I can empower them,” Primack said. “I know that there are so many opportunities coming. I think there is nothing better in this life than creating something yourself … putting it out there. I love my students, I want them to succeed.”

One of those students, Tyler Bozetski, paints a similar picture.

He’s very open,” Bozetski said. “He’s always eager to talk with people about the subject. He explains things clearly so you can understand. He’s very fun, humorous.”

Bob Mintzer, chairman of the jazz program at the University of Southern California and a Grammy-winning saxophonist, is a major supporter of Primack.

“His background in filmmaking, experience as a journalist and passion for the arts and humanities make Bret an amazing artist in his own right,” Mintzer said.

Primack tells stories in multiple ways—via video, the internet and writing. He realizes he has been lucky to meet many captivating individuals throughout his life.

“I’ve known a lot of interesting people,” Primack said.

Moe Irish / Aztec Press Instructor Bret Primack passes along his years of knowledge and passion for film-making while conferring with student Mark Yingst about a video edit for his Digital Video Production I course. The class teaches the techniques, equipment and history of digital film production.

Moe Irish / Aztec Press
Instructor Bret Primack passes along his years of knowledge and passion for film-making while conferring with student Mark Yingst about a video edit for his Digital Video Production I course. The class teaches the techniques, equipment and history of digital film production.

It’s game on for Desert Vista Gamer Club

It’s game on for Desert Vista Gamer Club

By MICHEAL ROMERO

Every Friday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., a collection of game enthusiasts connect Playstation 4’s to Pima Community College Smart Boards, cover table tops with Yu-Gi-Oh trading card mats and plug in their laptops to an endless supply of electricity.

They battle each other on any ground, with any game and any rules. And every Pima student is welcome to join.

They meet in room C-106 at Desert Vista campus and share experiences with games old and new, controller connected and keyboard detected.

They call themselves the Gamer’s Club and the bright yellow sign in mock 8-bit typography is sure to catch your attention.

Club president Miguel Sanchez has been commander-in-chief for two years. He’s had a three-year tenure at Pima, with plans to graduate in Fall 2017 or Spring 2018.

“I’ve been just trying to keep things going and keep the club afloat,” Sanchez said. “I can’t be president forever.”

Sanchez leads fundraising efforts that help pay for tournaments that the club has been holding for the past five years.

“The gaming club has always been doing tournaments but now we do them about three times a semester,” Sanchez said.

Sanchez also maintains contact with Student Life coordinator Guadalupe Caballero, who instructs him about the requirements necessary for retaining the club’s space on the campus.

In the past, the club met in the Ocotillo Room, but library renovations forced a change. The club now meets in the much smaller Room C-106 down the hall.

The group also lost members when it learned new campus guidelines only allow Pima students in clubs.

A recent tournament, held on April 15, featured the newly released Street Fighter V for the PS4. Prizes up for grabs that day included GameStop gift cards ranging in value from $5 to $25.

The first-prize winner Adrian Demara has been attending Pima for two years with the hope of getting an advanced business certificate in the next year.

“Business is something I understand and something I think will be useful in the future,” he said.

Demara took a one-year hiatus after high school to unwind from the pressures of academics, and began classes in the subsequent fall semester. “It was all slack for a year and then boom, responsibility,” he said.

Demara said he focuses most of his gaming fuel on the first-person-shooter franchise Call of Duty, when he has the time. In addition to attending classes during the day, Demara moonlights as an elementary school janitor.

Second-place winner David Marquez began attending at the recommendation of fellow club member Steven “Kenshi” Keovongsa, who helped spur his interest in the massive online battle arena game League of Legends.

Marquez has played fighting games since a young age. An arcade near his grandmother’s house allowed him to play Street Fighter II Turbo edition.

He was running the newer Street Fighter V for practice on his laptop, while the tournament was being played in the room on the provided Smart Board.

Marquez obtained his GED from Las Artes Youth Art Program and was awarded scholarship money after graduation.

“I wanted to be an engineer that programmed video games,” Marquez said. “Originally I was going to go to the University of Advancing Technology in Tempe, but I got sick my junior year.”

The setback kept Marquez from being able to the use the scholarship money he received to attend UAT but he was able to use that money for classes at Pima. He’s using his time at Pima to build up his academic background and to be better prepared when enlisting in the Army next spring.

His first attempt didn’t pan out as planned.

“I want 15 college credits so I won’t have to start out as an officer and I can get a particular job in security,” Marquez said. “I qualified for every job they had, even airborne, but the job I wanted filled up and I was put on the spot to pick a job I didn’t want.”

Marquez is currently focusing on anthropology and plans to use the G.I. Bill to pursue engineering after returning to college.

Keovongsa, who introduced Marquez to the club, hopes to boost the numbers of the group for a more rounded selection of competitors.

“We are always in need of new blood,” Keovongsa said. “It gets boring facing the same people.”

Keovongsa began attending the club in 2013 and focuses all of his attention on computer gaming.

To help pay for games and other necessities, Keovongsa previously worked with his mother in a restaurant.

He now partakes in a series of odd jobs as his form of income.

“I’m kind of like the paid go-fer for these guys,” Keovongsa said. “Whenever they need something, they just have me go.”

Keovongsa is pursuing electrical engineering, inspired by a desire to fix the electronics in his life on his own.

He plans to work in electronics while attending a four-year college for his degree.

Micheal Romero / Aztec Press Miguel Sanchez awards gift cards to winners of a Street Fighter V tournament. Gamer’s Club holds fundraisers to help pay for three tournaments per semester. The club, open to any Pima student, meets on Fridays.

Micheal Romero / Aztec Press
Miguel Sanchez awards gift cards to winners of a Street Fighter V tournament. Gamer’s Club holds fundraisers to help pay for three tournaments per semester. The club, open to any Pima student, meets on Fridays.

TOP 10 Best uses of ‘It’s a New Day’

TOP 10 Best uses of ‘It’s a New Day’

By MICHEAL ROMERO

In 1974, a band called Skull Snaps recorded its first and only album. One song on the self-titled record called “It’s a New Day” begins with one of the coldest drum breaks in the history of music.

The first artist to sample the break was rapper Stezo in 1989, but many others followed suit, taking the song to new heights.

Here are my favorite cuts that respect the sample by slowing it down, speeding it up or chopping it into some other funky fresh creation:

1. “Hittin’ Switches”

by Erick Sermon

The first pick on the list might just be pulling the sample as it exists in the Stezo version, but it takes a lot of confidence to leave a sample like that and build a song around it. This one features a deep bassline that complements the break like peanut butter to jelly.

2. “Coolie High”

by Camp Lo

This track off of their album “Uptown Saturday Night” runs the drum sample with a nice SP-1200 quality to accompany some bubbly vocal stabs. The flows from Cheeba and Suede intertwine on top of the beat and I’d even go so far as to say you could play this during more intimate moments.

3. “For Corners”

by Digable Planets

This song takes the break beat and flips it on its head. They ran the break through the MPC and just had fun with it. It takes each note apart and completely reworks the sound. It’s a seven minute odyssey that plays with your senses.

4. “Put it on”

by Big L

Everyone’s favorite rapper that was gone too soon, Big L, pulls the break beat for a track off of “Lifestylez Ov Da Poor & Dangerous,” which would prove to be one of his biggest hits. The reproduction of the sample here has a more groovy feel and it pairs nicely with L’s vocals for that gangster rap tinge.

5. “Mommy What’s a

Gravedigga?”

by Gravediggaz

This might be the shortest track on the list but it’s one of the more interesting tracks by keeping the funky mood of the song from which it samples. The cut serves as a slight interlude and it re-arranges the high-hat hits from the break beat to put out a jazzier selection than others on the list.

6. “Real Raw”

by Craig Mack

The break is slowed down and panned from the left channel to the right and boy is it raw. The song reaches demonic levels with its gospel-like background vocals and the break pushes it to whatever edge Mack is trying to reach.

7. “Who Got Da Props”

by Black Moon

It’s impossible not to bump your head to this hit from their 1992 release “Enta da Stage.” The use of the break beat here is really bassy and downplayed to allow uninterrupted flow from the group. This one is more of a chill-out song than others on the list and it serves its purpose as such.

8. “Passin’ Me By”

by The Pharcyde

It’s the song that opens Adam Sandler’s “Big Daddy,” when he’s half asleep and is receiving that phone call from his dad. Even though you’re probably more familiar with the organ riff borrowed from Quincy Jones, the Skull Snaps drum break lies underneath and producer J-Swift does his best to mute the highs to keep the track smooth and soulful.

9. “Hippa to da Hoppa”

by Ol’ Dirty Bastard

This RZA baked song is so damn dirty it’s appropriately produced for his cousin, the late great Big Baby Jesus. The bass is so damn loud, your dad probably couldn’t even make out the drums through the Alpine subwoofer he probably had in his 1996 Dodge Stratus.

10. “Poison (95 EP)”

by The Prodigy

You could fight someone to this song, or b-boy to it or even rave to it, which is probably what people in England did when it was released in 1995. A revised version from the one found on their 1994 release “Music for the Jilted Generation,” this one pulls all of the punches with no build up, just payoff.

GET 56001 SKULL SNAPS CD PASTE ON

Horoscopes

Horoscopes

By S. PAUL BRYAN

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

“Why do all balls look like they’re 150 years old?” -Whitney Cummings

Think of the information you’ve absorbed this year. Try to figure out why we, as humans, haven’t found the answer to Ms. Cummings question. It’s a brain teaser. Happy birthday.

Gemini (May 21-June 21)

“College seems like a pretty expensive way to become an alcoholic.” -Natasha Leggero

It’s true, Gemini. Alcoholism is an issue that you are working your way into, not away from. With your all-night drinking and “a little hair of the dog,” things aren’t looking good. Get help.

Cancer (June 22-July 22)

“I wanna live. I don’t wanna die. That’s the whole meaning of life: Not dying! I figured that shit out by myself in the third grade.” -George Carlin

Cancer, just don’t die this month and I think everything will be OK … at least for this month.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)

“I don’t set out to offend or shock, but I also don’t do anything to avoid it.” -Sarah Silverman

You’ve done it again, Leo. You’ve pissed everyone off and didn’t even mean to. They’re upset, but what are you supposed to do? Tip toe around all of these sensitive people? Nope.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

“I believe in the institution of marriage, and I intend to keep trying till I get it right.” -Richard Pryor

Keep at it, Virgo. Things will work out eventually. Don’t forget the witness and make sure to get those signatures in ink on the pre-nup.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

“Just because you are blind and unable to see my beauty doesn’t mean it does not exist.” -Margaret Cho

Do your thing, Libra. This is your month to shine. Get out there and be as beautiful as you want to be because you are just that, beautiful.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

“I’m Dave Chappelle and I’m a chronic masturbator.” -Dave Chappelle

Hey, Scorpio. Guess what you and Mr. Chappelle have in common. Yep. Do yourself, and those around you, a favor. Get a partner!

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

“I consider myself to be a pretty good judge of people … that’s why I don’t like any of them.” -Roseanne Barr

People. Who needs them? Not you. Stick to yourself over the coming weeks and enjoy your solitude. Go ahead, have some “me” time.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

“Life is full of misery, loneliness, and suffering, and it’s all over much too soon.” -Woody Allen

Think about it, Capricorn. Life’s a ____ and then you die. So, instead of letting life be a ____ to you, make life your ____. You’ll find it much more enjoyable that way.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

“Normal is just a cycle on the washing machine.” -Whoopi Goldberg

That’s right Aquarius, let your freak flag fly! Have fun, go wild and be yourself. Your life is set up for you to be however you want to be.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)

“Life is a four-letter word.” -Lenny Bruce

Sorry Pisces, this isn’t your month. Prepare yourself for the bad side of that bipolar conundrum we all call LIFE.

Aries (March 21-April 19)

“Everything’s amazing right now, and nobody’s happy.” -Louis C.K.

Aries, take a look around you and appreciate what the astrological gods have given you. Stop and smell the roses. Life is good.

Students to screen ‘La Llorona’ production

Students to screen ‘La Llorona’ production

By ALYSSA RAMER

Anyone who lives in Southern Arizona has without a doubt heard the legend of La Llorona. The weeping ghost, which figures prominently in Hispanic folklore, is said to be the tragic representation of a woman who lost her children (or drowned them, depending on the storyteller) and is cursed to wander the earth wailing and searching for them. According to the legend, she will bring misfortune to those who hear her.

La Llorona will be featured May 16-17 in a two-day digital film and video series presented by Pima Community College’s digital arts department. The screenings will include works from students in beginning and advanced classes. Some contain adult content and language.

The program will start at 7 p.m. both evenings at the West Campus Proscenium Theatre. The showings are free and open to the public.

While each night’s show will feature different student works, both will include showings of “La Llorona,” directed by digital video and film student Enoch Bradley.

Mur Caballero, a student involved in creating the movie, said about 20 to 25 students worked together to film “La Llorona” in Fall 2015.

“It was a lot of fun,” she said. “Everybody in the class was very passionate and motivated.”

Students spent the spring semester editing the movie. Adjunct instructor David Wing oversaw the production.

Caballero served as a producer for “La Llorona” and worked in other capacities as well. Students chose Bradley to be the director based on his written proposals,  Caballero said. The film was cast via auditions, with roles open to non-student cast members.

Caballero, who graduates from Pima this month, said she has learned about film for the last two years and continues to have a passion for filmmaking.

She and two classmates, Daniel and James Williford, decided to begin an independent enterprise, Rolling Shutter Media Company. The company works on video projects and has created videos of musical performances held in the Proscenium Theatre.

For more information about the digital screenings, call the CFA box office at 206-6986.

Pima Community College digital arts students work on the set of “La Llorona” at Tucson’s Agua Caliente Park. The film screens May 16-17. Photo courtesy of PCC Digital Arts

Pima Community College digital arts students work on the set of “La Llorona” at Tucson’s Agua Caliente Park. The film screens May 16-17.
Photo by David Harnick