I.T. GIRL: Please burst my bubble

By KATELYN ROBERTS

Despite the ease of access to virtually anything anywhere all of the time, technology still seems to stifle our growth as a coexisting community.

Filter bubbles are the reason you see posts from your closest friends, you laugh at most of the memes in your feed and you always see oddly accurate sponsored suggestions.

Social networks like Facebook collect information on the posts you like and share, your search history and the friends with whom you interact. The collected data plays a role in what you see on your newsfeed.

This results in an echo chamber called a filter bubble. Everyone’s bubble is different, but it isn’t directly created by you. It’s created by the website’s algorithm, which makes selective guesses about what you’d like to see next time you log into Facebook.

After a few clicks and an extensive search history, you become separated from opposing viewpoints.

Filter bubbles are the reason you don’t know too many folks outside your political spectrum.

They’re the reason a Trump win surprised many of us. They’re the reason the left sees the right as a bunch of racist hillbillies and the right views the left as a bunch of LGBT Satan-worshippers.

We just don’t understand each other. For something that was supposed to enhance communication, Facebook has done quite a good job of sheltering its users.

Brilliant coding goes into these algorithms and they’re quite handy, especially for businesses needing to know specific details about their clients. (Hey, I didn’t say it wasn’t also creepy.)

Krishna Kaliannan created EscapeYourBubble.com in response to being completely baffled by the presidential election results.

The site’s tagline is “be more accepting of others.” Its purpose is to send news articles your way that you’d normally not read or even see.

Harvard Business School student Henry Tsai created Hi From The Other Side, which connects users with people who would normally not be friends. Its tagline is “Meet someone who supported another candidate.”

It’s a little more complex, a little more specific and a lot more committal. Its sole purpose: understanding each other’s ideologies.

If you’re interested but not ready to meet a stranger from the other side of the ideology spectrum, you can just subscribe to Hi From The Other Side’s newsletters. That allows you to live vicariously through previous matches.

Pima Community College and University of Arizona student David Bresnick, a junior majoring in computer science, is familiar with filter bubbles.

“I knew the election would be everywhere all the time, so I turned it off before it was literally everywhere,” he said. “I put on ‘Trump’ and ‘Clinton’ filters for Google Chrome, so no ads or anything popped up too much.”

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