BEST BETS: Bust out holiday costumes

Compiled by Alex Fruechtenicht

Early November has so much to offer in Tucson, from unleashing your inner geek to honoring ancestors from many different cultures. Get out of your comfort zone and go get cultured.

TusCon: Oct. 31- Nov. 2

Looking for a small convention with a big emphasis on sci-fi? Look no further than TusCon, headquartered at 475 N. Granada Ave.

The con opens at noon on Halloween and stays open around the clock until Sunday evening. Activities include panels, special guests, LAN parties, a film festival, art show and an anime room pumping Japanese pop music.

Only 500 persons can attend, so buy tickets early. A full three-day ticket costs $55 for anyone above age 13. Admission costs $30 for those under 13.

Details: tusconscificon.com

Celtic Festival/ Scottish Highland Games

Oct. 31- Nov. 2

Head over to Rillito Raceway Park, 4502 N. First Ave., on Oct. 31 for a family night of trick or treating, with free admission until 6 p.m.

The next day, a Celtic festival and highland games get underway with contests, live music, Scottish and Irish dancing, whisky tasting and much more.

An adult ticket costs $20 for the weekend or $15 for a one-day pass. Senior or military tickets are $10, and youth tickets cost $5.

Festivities run from 9 a.m.-10 p.m. on Saturday, and from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on Sunday.

Details: tucsoncelticfestival.org

Floating Lantern Workshop and Ceremony

Nov. 1

If you want to honor your ancestors like the Japanese do, visit Yume Japanese Gardens of Tucson at 2130 N. Alvernon Way.

People in Japan celebrate Obon, a festival that honors ancestors by making floating lanterns and releasing them onto water. Yume will help Tucsonans make their own obon lanterns at a workshop that starts at 4 p.m. Participants will release their lantern into a large koi pond.

The workshop costs $3, along with gardens admission of $9 for adults and $5 for children ages 3 to 15. Students with ID get in for $6.

Reserve a spot by emailing or calling in advance at yume.gardens@gmail.com or 322-2928.

Details:

tucsonjapanesegardens.org

2nd Saturdays Downtown

Nov. 8

Family fun at 2nd Saturdays includes live music, dancers and loads of shopping opportunities, with street vendors and restaurants staying open later than normal. The fun begins at 5 p.m.

The Nov. 8 event will feature live music from The Jonestown Band and Greyhound Soul.

The public shows are free for music fans of all ages to enjoy.

The Fox Theater will be showcase Black Violin at 7:30 p.m. with genres ranging from classical to hip hop and bluegrass with tickets starting at $18.

Details:

2ndsaturdaysdowntown.com

Tucson Comic-Con: Nov. 8-9

Can’t make it outside the city for the San Diego or New York Comic-Con? No worries. Tucson Comic-Con has got you covered.

Doors at the Tucson Convention Center, 260 S. Church Ave., open on Saturday at 10 a.m. and stay open until 7 p.m. The convention continues on Sunday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

A day pass will run you $10, while a weekend pass costs $15. Tickets can be purchased at the door.

Details: tucsoncomic-con.com

All Souls Procession

Nov. 9

Día de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is a Mexican tradition honoring those who have passed on. Tucson adds its own unique style with the annual All Souls Procession.

The free procession will start about 4 p.m. at 400 N. Sixth Ave. The grand finale begins at Mercado San Agustin on West Congress after the procession arrives, usually between 8:30-9 p.m.

Performers include Flam Chen, Danza Azteca Calpulli Tonantzin, Odaiko Sonora and the Community Spirit Group.

Check the website for numerous activities leading up the main event, and to view the procession route.

Details: allsoulsprocession.org

Veterans Day Parade

Nov. 11

Tucson’s Veterans Day parade, held each year to thank all veterans, starts from 330 W. Franklin St. at 11 a.m. and follows a route through downtown.

Use the website map to stake out a spot for free viewing.

Details:

tucsonveteransdayparade.org

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