RSSArchive for January, 2010

Track and field hoping to produce champions

Track and field hoping to produce champions

Story and photo by Daniel Gaona

Like always, Pima Community College women’s and men’s track and field coach Greg Wenneborg has high hopes entering the season. Among those hopes is a big one: crown another individual national champion.

For three straight years Pima has had one athlete win a title. Last year it was Aurora Trujillo in the 3000 steeplechase and the year before it was Jeremiah Korn in shotput. Nicole Smith had a hat trick in 2007, winning the high jump, long jump and triple jump titles.

“We’re trying to keep the streak alive and I think that could be the story for the year if everything goes well,” Wenneborg said.

For the teams overall, he wants both to finish top 10 at nationals. The women have managed to do so the last three years and Wenneborg feels this could be the year for the men.

He said the roster exploded with talent and there are currently more than 75 athletes on it.

“We’re dealing with trying to manage a lot of student athletes but we’re really excited because we seem to be fully loaded in just about every area,” Wenneborg added. “We have very few weaknesses this year.”

Wenneborg feels the Aztecs will excel in jumping events this year. He credits jumps coach Chad Harrison’s brilliant recruiting for bringing in talent.

“I think the jumps are going to be enormous for us and they’ve been a non-factor in previous years,” he said.

Wenneborg also thinks the team’s speed will stand out on the national level.

“I think the sprints are going to post some national class times,” he said.

Among the sprinting events is the men’s 4×400 relay, made up of sophomores Stephan Bullard, Chris Phillips and Phillip Hobart. There is still one more spot to be filled in place of Johnathan Lopez, who will miss the season with a knee injury but Wenneborg believes they can shatter the school record.

“We believe they can break the school record by maybe more than four or five seconds,” he said. “Doing that in a sprint event is amazing.”

Bullard is most likely the top athlete on the men’s side. Aside from doing the 4×400 he will also compete in the 800-meter dash. Last year at nationals he placed fourth in that event and his 1:51.6 broke the school record.

“I think I peaked beautifully and the season went very well, I did get fourth in the nation but I want to expand on that,” Bullard said about last season. “I hope to get sub 1:50 this year and hopefully win the national title. I want to build up my strength and stay strong and injury free.”

Wenneborg said heptahlets and decathletes are also stepping up for the team this year. The women compete in seven events and the men compete in 10.

Stephanie Montano is looking forward to having a breakout season after setting a lifetime personal record in pole vault at a UA winter meet.

“This is my first season doing heptathlon in general and I just want to excel in things that I am good at,” she said. “Hopefully I can do well in the running events but I have to work on the jumps.”

Central Arizona College will be a heavy favorite to win the region, according to Wenneborg. He said Mesa Community College and Paradise Valley Community College would be Pima’s main competition.

“We will beat Central Arizona in some events but as a team I don’t know if we are there yet,” he added. “We’re all shooting to have them looking over their shoulder for one of us to be region champion.”

Share
Athletic Voice: Experience will power Colts

Athletic Voice: Experience will power Colts

By Daniel Gaona

After both came close to going undefeated in the regular season and both survived the playoffs as the No. 1 seeds, the Indianapolis Colts and New Orleans Saints will face off in Miami for Super Bowl XLIV on Feb. 7.

The Saints clinched their first ever NFC Championship with a 31-28 overtime win against the Minnesota Vikings on Jan. 24. New Orleans exploded to an impressive 13-0 start before losing its final three games. The disappointing finish left fans concerned but it didn’t daunt the team.

In the AFC, the Colts have found their way back to the Super Bowl for the second time in four years. The 30-17 win over the high-flying New York Jets could be deemed as revenge for ending Indianapolis’ perfect season at 14-0.

Nevertheless, first-year Colts coach Jim Caldwell was the one who decided to rest players in the final two weeks, also causing some worry.

New Orleans’ trademark is an explosive offense. In just two postseason games, the Saints have led the league with 76 points.

The offense, led by quarterback Drew Brees, was the top scoring team in the regular season as well with 510 points. It also averaged more than 400 yards a game in the regular season.

The Saints can also play defense. New Orleans survived off blitzing schemes against Arizona and Minnesota, and its defense was constantly in the quarterback’s face.

Indianapolis is loaded on both sides of the ball. Peyton Manning is arguably the best quarterback to play the game and he is the heart and soul of the team. He threw for 4,500 yards and 33 touchdowns.

Reggie Wayne and Dallas Clark were two of his favorite targets in the regular season; both had 100 receptions and 10 touchdowns. However, Pierre Garcon and Austin Collie have been the two top receivers in the playoffs. They combined for 360 yards and three touchdowns in two games.

Combining the Colts’ lockdown defense with their powerful offense is a deadly combination, especially late in the game when the entire team is clicking.

The game might be close, but from what I see the winner is easy to pick. Experience will be a factor and only one mistake could make a difference.

The Colts won three years ago in Miami and they are going to win again. Manning was named the regular season MVP, but he won’t be happy until he hoists the Lombardi trophy once again.

Editor’s pick: Colts 34, Saints 24.

Share
PCC opposes bill allowing armed faculty

PCC opposes bill allowing armed faculty

 By D.J. Ochoa

Pima Community College officials oppose a state proposal that would allow college faculty members to carry guns on campus.

Sen. Jack Harper, R-Surprise, introduced a bill that would let faculty members who have concealed weapon permits bring their weapons onto community college and university campuses.

State-issued concealed weapon permits require a background check. Permit holders must show they know how to handle a firearm and have some training on when deadly force can be used.

“It’s a long-time goal of mine to make sure there are no defense-free zones where criminals know they can go into an establishment and there’ll be no law-abiding citizens there that can legally protect themselves,” Harper said.

The veteran legislator said his proposal would protect college students and employees.

However, PCC administrators doubt that armed faculty members would mean a safer campus.

“It seems to me that the likelihood of having a deranged person walk into a specific classroom and pull out a gun and aim it at a faculty member or other people is quite low,” Chancellor Roy Flores told Capitol News Media.

PCC Department of Public Safety Chief Stella Bay said the bill would not increase safety in any way.

“PCC has opposed similar legislation in the past and opposes this bill,” she said via e-mail. “It is the view of PCC that a weapons-free college is the safest environment for students and employees.”

Bay firmly believes that any threatening situation that occurs on school grounds should be handled by PCC’s Department of Public Safety.

“PCC Department of Public Safety personnel are trained in the use of firearms and are dedicated to ensuring safety at college facilities,” she said. “They should be the only people allowed to carry weapons at college facilities.”

Share
PCC ENROLLMENT BOOMING

PCC ENROLLMENT BOOMING

Photo by Gabi Pina

Pima Community College students register for classes at West Campus. College officials say enrollment, which normally dips slightly in the spring semester, has increased by double digits this year.

Share

Pima News

Compiled by Narciso Villarreal

College offers free computer training

If you are struggling with computers, Pima Community College can help.

Computer workshops are currently available for students at no cost to help them with fundamental computer skills.

The one-hour workshops will cover information on computer files and folders, resources, programs, how to use the Internet and more.

Workshops are scheduled daily through Feb. 12 at five PCC campuses at a variety of times.

Reservations are preferred, but students without reservations can participate in the workshops if there is room available.

For a complete workshop schedule, visit www.pima.edu or call 206-4500.

PCC to host three Transfer Fairs

Pima Community College will hold three Transfer Fairs to provide students with information on majors, admission and transfer requirements, and more.

The sessions will be:
•    Feb. 9: East Campus, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Student Center Building, Main Street.
•    Feb. 10: Downtown Campus, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., CC Building, ground floor.
•    Feb. 11: Northwest Campus, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Promenade, second level.

For further information, visit www.pima.edu or call 206-4500.

‘Love Your Major’ set for Feb. 17

A ‘Love Your Major’ event will be Feb. 17 at West Campus to provide information about transferring to the University of Arizona.

The event will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the West Campus student lounge.

Students can explore career opportunities with UA and PCC staff and faculty. Representatives from the UA’s admissions and financial aid offices will attend, along with staff and advisers from UA’s17 colleges.

For further information, call 206-4500.

Share
Women's basketball aims for playoffs

Women’s basketball aims for playoffs

Photo by Daniel Gaona

Story by Eric Townsend

Luck ran out for the Pima Community College women’s basketball team when it traveled to Mesa Community College Jan. 20, but the Aztecs are still hoping for another strong season finish.

After a lackluster 1-3 start, the team was riding an eight-game winning streak. Pima had won 13 of its last 15 games before it faced the Mesa Thunderbirds. As of Jan. 20, the team was ranked eighth in Division II.

“We can’t go in to every game expecting we’re going to win,” sophomore guard Nene Villalobos said. “We have to continue working hard.”

The Aztecs’ winning streak came to a halt after the 78-74 loss to Mesa. However, the team looked at it as a reality check.

“It was a game we probably should have won,” head coach Todd Holthaus said. “But it served as a good wake-up call. We had been kind of coasting lately.”

Yet, the loss didn’t discourage the experienced team and the Aztecs quickly rebounded. Pima answered with a dominating 78-43 win over visiting Cochise Community College on Jan. 23.

“We want to be number one in the conference and that’s our goal,” sophomore guard Jessica Jones said. “We have to finish strong and keep winning.”

Despite their poor shooting, the Aztecs efficiently used quickness, athleticism and overall depth, which ultimately overpowered and wore out the Apaches.

“We were letting them fly,” Holthaus said. “We shot something like 34 three-pointers and made like 12. Our depth is what wore them out though; we had like six or seven players with double-digit minutes.”

Villalobos led the Aztecs with 17 points. Jones totaled 13 points and standout Tia Morrison was just behind with 12. Sophomore Sara Nicholson chipped in with 10.

With the win, Pima still sits in first place of the Arizona Community College Athletic Conference standings for Division II members.

The Aztecs are 10-2 in the conference and 15-5 overall. They hold a two-game lead over Mesa Community College, which is in second place at 8-4. The two will face off Feb. 26 to close out the season and most likely again in the postseason.

“Our goal is to finish strong, we’re in first place right now,” Holthaus said. “We need to keep playing well and wrap up the No. 1 seed.”

The Aztecs won at Arizona Western College on Jan. 27, 60-55, their first ever win in Yuma.

Pima will face Phoenix College on Jan. 30 in an away game.

Share
‘Jersey Shore’ not your mama’s reality show

‘Jersey Shore’ not your mama’s reality show

By Debbie Hadley

“Jersey Shore,” the newest controversial reality television series from MTV, has both shocked and entranced America in its short two-month run.

Compromised of mostly New York bred Italian-American young adults, it has received heavy criticism from the Italian-American community and other interest groups.

They feel the show portrays “Italian” stereotypes and uses derogatory terms such as “Guido” and “Guidette.” Both complaints have been dismissed by the cast as invalid.

Those issues aside (which have yet to keep its millions of viewers at bay), the basic premise is simple. If you’ve seen “The Real World,” you’re already in the know.

Camera crews follow eight men and women ranging in age from 21 to 28 who stay in Seaside Heights, N.J., in August 2009 while they work and play on “the shore.”

In Tucson, the last episode and reunion show of “Jersey Shore” will replay Jan. 28 from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Full episodes of the entire season can be found on MTV.com.

“Jersey Shore” first aired on Dec. 3 with more than a million viewers. The numbers quickly rose after an episode in which Nicole (aka “Snookie”) got punched in the face by an overzealous bar patron.

Other caricatures include Mike “The Situation” (see bulging biceps and six-pack abs) and Sammi “Sweatheart” (“I’m the sweetest bitch you’ll ever meet.”)

It doesn’t take long to fall in love with each of them. If you’re looking for bar fights, East Coast accent-ridden banter and pure gold programming in your reality show lineup, start from the beginning and let the entertainment flow from the screen to your jaw-dropped expression.

Because, yes, there is an art to fist pumping. Every time cast members hit their favorite club, “Kharma,” they show you how to do it right.

Share
Horoscope

Horoscope

By Taylor Bock

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Try not to think too much, Aquarius. Over-thinking has been the bane of many healthy young college students. Just keep in mind the KISS method, “Keep-It-Simple-Stupid,” as opposed to SWAG, “Scientific-Wild-Ass-Guess.”

Pisces (Feb.19-March 20)
It’s a new year, Pisces. It’s time to be more open to things that used to seem taboo. Ever thought of getting a tattoo? Go get one. Ever been curious about snakes? Get one as a pet. Ever thought of joining a cult? Hell, be the best damn cultist you can be.

Aries (March 21-April 19)
It must suck to come back to Pima, Aries. Now you’re in class instead of sleeping through the morning. Unless you’re like me and don’t start the day ‘til noon. High five to all the other readers who get to sleep in.

Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Things may be feeling a little weird right now, Taurus. It could be coming back to school, or it could be the two tiny puncture wounds on your ankle. If it’s the latter, you probably got bit by a rattlesnake. Call 911.

Gemini (May 21-June 21)
Do you feel discouraged, Gemini? Does it feel like your life is going nowhere and you’ve just wasted your time going to classes? Well, you’re probably right. But keep going to class anyway. It gets you out of the house.

Cancer (June 22- July 22)
You’re feeling pretty confident, Cancer. It’s a bright, sunny day full of opportunity to get a leg up in life. Go be awesome and successful. Then go rub it in a Gemini’s face just to piss them off.

Leo (July 23- Aug. 22)
This a good time for relationships, Leo. Make some new friends in your classes, or maybe find a nice boyfriend/girlfriend. But just for reference, don’t use the mole on your back that looks like Mick Jagger as a conversation starter.

Virgo (Aug. 23- Sept. 22)
Someone else isn’t doing their share of the work, Virgo. You’ve got a slacker in your life and you need to wake them up. I recommend a burlap sack filled with oranges. I hear oranges don’t leave bruises.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Are you thinking about Valentine’s Day, Libra? It pays to think ahead. Plan a romantic night with a soft and lovely mix CD. Just try not to accidentally get Ramstein mixed in there. Nothing interrupts a tender moment like angry German heavy metal.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Let your imagination take the pilot seat, Scorpio. Take something boring and make it amazing. Tired of the same boring turkey sandwich? Add some applesauce and gummi bears. Will it taste better? Maybe not, but it’s sure as hell more interesting!

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec 21)
You’re about to have some interesting luck, Sagittarius. Prepare yourself for whatever could happen. You might find 20 dollars on the ground. Or flying monkeys might try to kidnap you. I’d start bringing a golf club to campus, just in case.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan 19)
The coming days are all about willpower, Capricorn. Get out there and prove how much will you have. Swallow a spoonful of wasabi, then go two hours without food or drink. Just to prove that you can.

Share
Sapphire Club new to downtown scene

Sapphire Club new to downtown scene

Story and photos by Marie Rodriguez

It’s a Saturday night on Congress, and the sidewalks are crowded with club-goers dressed to impress. At Sapphire, many people are discouraged to see the line crawl around the side of the building yet are determined to get into the hot new club.

For the people lined up outside Sapphire, there’s a mix of anticipation and frustration. The line hasn’t moved for 15 minutes.

Groups waiting below the sky bar can see those lucky and smart enough to arrive early, enjoying the only rooftop patio in Tucson. As the music drifts down to the street, there’s debate on whether to go somewhere else or stay and wait.

Ten minutes later, a bouncer comes out and announces the club is at maximum capacity. While the end of the line dissipates, those in front give persuasion a try. “There’s just two of us.” “Our friends are inside.”

Even a last-resort plea of media coverage with the manager does not work. There’s already a building full of partiers enjoying a good time.

Later in the night, the club isn’t so full and the bouncers allow more people in.
Sapphire is a mix of modern and classic design. A couple of flat TV screens hang on the wall on either side of the main bar, the far one hanging above a crisp white piano.

There’s room to dance and a few tables to sit at, but mostly nicely dressed people mingling… wait, are those the stairs? Is that another line??

Standing at the bottom of the stairs is another gatekeeper, a bouncer waiting to allow people up to the sky bar currently at capacity.

Shortly, the line is allowed upstairs to a second level complete with more tables, another bar, the main dance floor and the DJ. This floor has a whole different mood, party.

Windows on the north end, opposite the dance floor, look out to the patio a few stairs above. Outside there are more tables and even a few large, cozy chairs.

The many heat lamps keep the entire patio at a comfortable temperature despite the chilly night. This patio crowd is more relaxed, much like on the first level.

“Up here I feel like I’m in New York, like on ‘Sex and the City,’” said Vanessa, declining to give her last name.

Downtown Tucson is about to get busier.

Sapphire is open Wednesday through Saturday. There’s no cover charge for Wednesdays and Thursdays, while it costs $5 for Fridays and Saturdays. On Thursdays the rooftop patio is closed.

Wednesday nights, Sapphire offers $5 bottle beer and $3 cosmopolitan drink specials.

FYI
Address: 61 E. Congress St.
Dress code: upscale
Cover: Wed-Thurs none, Fri-Sat $5
For VIP tables and bottle service, call: 306-8116
www.facebook.com/sapphirelounge
www.twitter.com/sapphiretucson

Share
Annual poetry contest offers cash prizes

Annual poetry contest offers cash prizes

By William Brown

The eighteenth annual Hearst Poetry Contest is now accepting submissions from Pima Community College students.

Deadline for receipt of entries is Monday, Feb. 8, by 4:30 p.m.

Students who wish to submit their poetry must be currently enrolled at PCC in pursuit of a bachelor’s degree, and cannot possess any undergraduate or graduate degrees.

The cash awards for poems are split into two categories: the Frederica Hearst Prize for Lyrical Poetry and the John Hearst Prize for Populist Poetry.

Both categories have a $300 first prize, with four runner-up awards of $50.

Physician Marlys Hearst Witte sponsors the poetry contest each year to honor her late parents.

Students may submit one poem, which must be an original composition. The poem must be on a sheet of its own, along with the title. Your name must not be on the poem sheet.

Submissions must be accompanied by an entry form, with the following information: student’s name, ID number, college (PCC), year in school, current address, e-mail address, current telephone number and title of poem.

Entries can be mailed to Marlys Hearst Witte, Attn: “Hearst Undergraduate Poetry Contest,” The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Dept. of Surgery, P.O. Box 245200, Tucson, AZ, 85724-5200.

If you wish to deliver an entry in person, it can be dropped by Room 4406, Arizona Health Sciences Center, UA campus.

A reception to honor winners and all entrants will be held March 23 at the Arizona Health Sciences Center.

If you have any questions, call 626-6118 and leave a message. Your call will be returned as quickly as possible.

Share
Classes offer survival of the fittest

Classes offer survival of the fittest

Story and photo by Mike Hawkins

Most of us have a pretty good time over the holidays. We eat, drink and get merry. Then we notice it on our waistlines. We tell ourselves it’s OK. We’ll just make a New Year’s resolution and deal with it. Then we drop those resolutions right about now.

So what’s to be done about this ever-expanding situation? One option is to take one of Pima Community College’s many fitness classes. Not at all a collection of boring retreads that already collect dust in your DVD collection, these classes will make you work up a sweat while having a good time.

Fitness and Wellness options at PCC are as varied as they are specific. Classes are offered at four campuses – Desert Vista, East, Northwest and West. In addition, some classes meet at sites such as the Chinese Cultural Center, Catalina High School, UA South and city golf courses.

Procrastinators who didn’t get enrolled for the 16-week semester still have options. Some late-start classes begin in February or March.

Check the course catalog, which is posted online at www.pima.edu, for a complete list of classes.

Those looking to get fit for a strenuous job would be wise to consider taking Fitness and Wellness 104F1: Conditioning for Physically Demanding Jobs.

If you want to compete in a triathlon, there are courses to match every discipline of the sport. If you are chronologically advanced, FAW 108: Senior Fitness might suit your needs.

Dance class options include ballroom, belly dancing, Latin and salsa, plus aerobics classes that move to jazz and Latin rhythms. Strength and flexibility classes range from boot camp-style circuit training to Pilates to weight training to yoga.

Sports fans can try Aikido, basketball, golf, indoor cycling, pickle-ball, tennis, running, swimming, soccer, Tae Kwon do, T’ai-chi Chuan or volleyball.

A good class to take if you haven’t been working out much is FAW 136: Stretch and Tone. Course instructor Katy Montano has been in the fitness industry for 20 years and has taught at PCC for about 15 years.

“It is a good class for beginners,” Montano said of Stretch and Tone. “It’s good for toning and muscular endurance and it’s a good class for those that are already fit.”

If you are after a serious workout, you may enjoy a kickboxing class with Chris Crawford. Crawford spent the majority of the first class session leading her students through what must have been a rough core workout session.

Dance music pumped away in the background as Crawford explained the finer points of the exercises.

Just when it seemed like the entire class was on the verge of collapse, Crawford let students know what they would face in the future.

“One time I had a student throw up in class,” Crawford said. “I love it when that happens.”

Share
Nota Bene trio to perform Jan. 31

Nota Bene trio to perform Jan. 31

 

By Andrew Hurst

Nota Bene, a trio of musicians, will perform in concert Jan. 31 at 3 p.m. in Pima Community College’s West Campus Center for the Arts Recital Hall.

Formerly known as A Pair o’ Pipes, Nota Bene features flutist Sandy Schwoebel, soprano Elena Todd and pianist Jeffrey Campbell.

The concert will include performances of “Nell dolce dell ‘oblio” by George Friderick Handel, “Une Flûte Invisible” by Camille Saint-Sanes, “Élégie” by Jules Massente, “Sing, Smile and Slumber” by Charles Gounod and “Three Irish Folksong Settings” by John Corigliano.

Schwoebel is a PCC music instructor who holds a doctor of musical arts degree from the Cleveland Institute of Music. She also works as an artist in Tucson Unified School District’s Opening Minds through the Arts program. She has played chamber music and worked with flute choirs.

Todd holds degrees from The Peabody Institute and Cornell University. She has played in opera, oratorio and musical theater, and is a two-time winner of the Pavarotti International Voice Competition. Todd has performed with the Arizona Symphonic winds, Tucson Pops, Catalina Chamber Orchestra, Civic Orchestra of Tucson, Tucson Masterworks Chorale, Bach Marathon and Southern Arizona Light Opera.

Campbell is associate music director and organist of St. Philip’s in the Hills Episcopal Church. He is an organist, harpsichordist and accompanist for local ensembles and performers, including Tucson Chamber Artists and Masterworks Chorale. He is particularly noted for his interpretations of the music of J.S. Bach.

Tickets for the concert cost $6, with discounts available. Box office hours are Tuesday-Friday, noon-5 p.m., and one hour before performances.

For more information, call 206-6986 or visit online at www.pima.edu/cfa.

FYI
What: Nota Bene concert
When: Sunday, Jan. 31, at 3 p.m.
Where: PCC Center for the Arts Recital Hall, West Campus
Tickets: $6
Box office: 206-6986

Share

Annual poetry contest offers cash prizes

By William Brown

The eighteenth annual Hearst Poetry Contest is now accepting submissions from Pima Community College students.

Deadline for receipt of entries is Monday, Feb. 8, by 4:30 p.m.

Students who wish to submit their poetry must be currently enrolled at PCC in pursuit of a bachelor’s degree, and cannot possess any undergraduate or graduate degrees.

The cash awards for poems are split into two categories: the Frederica Hearst Prize for Lyrical Poetry and the John Hearst Prize for Populist Poetry.

Both categories have a $300 first prize, with four runner-up awards of $50.

Physician Marlys Hearst Witte sponsors the poetry contest each year to honor her late parents.

Students may submit one poem, which must be an original composition. The poem must be on a sheet of its own, along with the title. Your name must not be on the poem sheet.

Submissions must be accompanied by an entry form, with the following information: student’s name, ID number, college (PCC), year in school, current address, e-mail address, current telephone number and title of poem.

Entries can be mailed to Marlys Hearst Witte, Attn: “Hearst Undergraduate Poetry Contest,” The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Dept. of Surgery, P.O. Box 245200, Tucson, AZ, 85724-5200.

If you wish to deliver an entry in person, it can be dropped by Room 4406, Arizona Health Sciences Center, UA campus.

A reception to honor winners and all entrants will be held March 23 at the Arizona Health Sciences Center.

If you have any questions, call 626-6118 and leave a message. Your call will be returned as quickly as possible.

Share
Having a gun will not make you safer

Having a gun will not make you safer

By Daniel Gaona

We’ve all seen the old western movies. Clint Eastwood had the aim to shoot a fly, but let’s not forget that was film and not reality.

However, the Arizona legislature wants to make fantasy into reality by pushing “pro-right” gun laws into effect.

One legislative proposal would let faculty members carry weapons on college campuses. Guns should never be allowed on any school grounds.

Even if access was limited to faculty, it is dangerous having guns around. Pima Community College has its own department of public safety, just like other colleges, for a reason. Leave it to trained professionals.

Last fall, state legislators passed a law that allows guns in establishments that serve alcohol.

Unless the owner posts a sign prohibiting it, any permit holder can carry in a concealed weapon. The permit holder isn’t supposed to consume any alcohol but there is no way to monitor everyone in the premises.

That is why no one under 21 is allowed in a bar. Just because they say they’re not going to drink doesn’t mean they’re telling the truth.

Alcohol and weapons are two things that don’t mix, just like driving intoxicated. Both are potential deadly combinations. It’s ridiculous for the government to allow it.

If a fight breaks out and punches are thrown, you might get tossed into the mix and end up with a black eye. Once guns come out, you risk being shot and possibly killed.

Guns can be good for recreational use such as hunting and at shooting ranges. They can also be handy for people living where they might need to defend themselves. Outside of that, it gets tricky.

People who feel the need to carry a gun with them when they go out of their homes might as well just stay home. Seeing someone carrying a gun in public can cause discomfort for all the other people in the area.

Obviously, there are many illegal weapons on the streets but having a gun wouldn’t really defend against them. That goes back to not putting yourself in a scenario that is dangerous.

If you live in a bad area and having a gun makes you feel safer, then get one. Just make sure you protect it so it doesn’t end up in the wrong hands.

The economy is in horrible condition right now, mainly due to deregulation. Let’s make sure that something similar doesn’t happen with the deregulation of weapons.

Share
Student apartments = lack of sleep

Student apartments = lack of sleep

By Debbie Hadley

In a student-friendly apartment complex that shall remain nameless, there lives a girl who moved in last August with low expectations. They were exceedingly met.

What is it about student housing, where under-age drinkers congregate in masses and ant infestations are at their highest? Such is the life here.

I currently live with three roommates, all of whom were unknown to me before my move-in. They are exceptionally nice, luckily for me. I can’t imagine getting stuck with the guy who fatally damaged five parked cars last month.

The four of us share a small apartment in a complex where it is not uncommon to get a whiff of the stale aroma from last night’s kegger on a Thursday morning. Minding my step over the previous night’s beer cans that sometimes litter the sidewalk is another weekday hazard.

For those of you who like to party on weekdays, let me voice the opinion of those of us who depend on rest rather than Red Bulls: “Go to sleep!” No one wants to hear Ke$ha at 2 a.m. on a Tuesday.

Or maybe I just don’t. But that should mean something (introverts out there, throw me a bone here.)

Seriously, maybe it’s because I’m 22—which makes me two or three years older than the girls I room with (i.e., officially old, so the lack of patience with an abundance of noise comes naturally) —but I truly cannot stand the racket.

The walls are so thin that the sound system from next door, the living room, upstairs (insert other close proximity area) rumbles and pounds all night long, bouncing around the walls of my brain, keeping me from dreamless, blissful sleep.

Regardless, sleep is hard to obtain otherwise when my upstairs neighbor is slappin’ the bass with little to no skill. Let’s be honest. No skill. Really, it’s just noise.

Life, however, moves ever-forward. While I will still be privy to all the hustle and bustle of student apartment life that my part-time job can afford me, I’ll look back and wonder how I survived without taking all the pain pills I can legally swallow.

Share
VENTOLIN PRICE